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For many questions, especially for C-related ones, the answer seems to be found in "the standard". However, where do we find that - online?
Googling can sometimes feel futile, again especially for the C standards, since they are drowned in the flood of discussions on programming forums ;)

To get this started, since these are the ones I am searching for right now, where are there good online resources for:

  • C89
  • C99
  • C++03
  • C++11
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I found a very comprehensive list of places to obtain the C standards (no C++ standards though):<br> clc-wiki.net/wiki/The_C_Standard#Obtaining_the_Standard –  ibic Jul 5 '12 at 7:00
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14 Answers

up vote 156 down vote accepted

As of December 2012, the best locations by price for C/C++ standards documents in PDF are:

If you want a hardcopy of the C90 standard for much less money than above, you may be able to find a cheap used copy of Herb Schildt's book The Annotated ANSI Standard at Amazon, contains the actual text of the standard.


As mentioned in several answers here, the draft versions of these standards are freely downloadable (refer to those answers or Google for download locations). However, in my opinion, even though the draft versions might be very close to the final ratified versions of the standards, you should really get a copy of the actual documents - especially if you're planning on quoting them as references. Of course, starving students should go ahead and use the drafts if strapped for cash.


It appears that, if you are willing and able to wait a few months after ratification of a standard, to search for "NCITS/ISO/IEC" instead of "ISO/IEC" when looking for a standard is the key. This way I was able to find the C++11 standard at reasonable price and now the C11 standard. So as an example you search for "NCITS/ISO/IEC 9899:2011" instead of "ISO/IEC 9899:2011" on webstore.ansi.org and will find the reasonably priced version.

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33  
The problem with Schildt's book is that his comments severely devalue the standard he comments on. –  sbi Feb 3 '11 at 15:42
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Very bad book recommendation (Herb Schildt's), See this: lysator.liu.se/c/schildt.html –  Wiz Jun 3 '11 at 9:57
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I'm aware of the review - I mention the book only as a possible way to get the standard very inexpensively. But I suppose that people should know about the review as well. I'd suggest one just ignore the annotation part of the book if you want the inexpensive standard hardcopy (that's what I do). –  Michael Burr Jun 3 '11 at 14:26
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Schildt's book (which I think is out of print) was much cheaper than a printed copy of the actual standard. It's been suggested that the price difference reflects the value of the annotations. Every copy of the book should be accompanied by a printout of Clive D.W. Feather's The Annotated Annotated C Standard. (Note that some introductory material is missing from Schildt's book.) –  Keith Thompson Dec 9 '11 at 21:12
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@MichaelBurr, all of the standard can be found free in www.open-std.org since you have the accepted answer, how about changing the links to the free ones? –  Visa is Racism Jun 14 '12 at 15:43
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Online versions of the standard can be found:

Working Draft, Standard for Programming Language C++

This seems to be the new standard:
This version requires Authentication
2014-03-02: N3936 C++14 (Or very close)

All the following are freely downloadable
2013-10-13: N3797
2013-05-16: N3691
2013-05-15: N3690 This proposed C++14 standard (being voted on)
2012-11-02: N3485
2012-02-28: N3376
2012-01-16: N3337 Essentially C++11 with minor errors and typos corrected

This seems to be the new standard:
This version requires Authentication
2011-04-05: N3291 C++11 (Or Very Close)

The following all draft versions of the standard:
All the following are freely downloadable
2011-02-28: N3242 (differences from N3291 very minor)
2010-11-27: N3225
2010-08-21: N3126
2010-03-29: N3090
2010-02-16: N3035
2009-11-09: N3000
2009-09-25: N2960
2009-06-22: N2914
2009-03-23: N2857
2008-10-04: N2798
2008-08-25: N2723
2008-06-27: N2691
2008-05-19: N2606
2008-03-17: N2588
2008-02-04: N2521
2007-10-22: N2461
2007-08-06: N2369
2007-06-25: N2315
2007-05-07: N2284
2006-11-03: N2134
2006-04-21: N2009
2005-10-19: N1905
2005-04-27: N1804

All the below versions require Authentication
2004-11-05: N1733
2004-07-16: N1655 Unofficial
2004-02-07: N1577 C++03 (Or Very Close)
2001-09-13: N1316 Draft Expanded Technical Corrigendum
1997-00-00: N1117 Draft Expanded Technical Corrigendum

All the following are freely downloadable
1996-00-00: N0836 Draft Expanded Technical Corrigendum
1995-00-00: N0785 Working Paper for Draft Proposed International Standard for Information Systems - Programming Language C++

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You might want to mention what standard the links take you to! Also adding the C11 standard: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1570.pdf –  Visa is Racism Jun 14 '12 at 9:11
    
@Shahbaz: I am not familiar with all the copies of the C standard (as I don't write C code (only C++)). You may want to start your own answer or edit one of the answers below that deals explicitly with the C language (See the one below this). –  Loki Astari Jun 14 '12 at 15:32
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+1 for keeping a list that is constantly more up-to-date than even ISO working group 21. –  Lundin Oct 25 '13 at 14:03
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+1 for the list; only to add that all drafts are available as the git repository github.com/cplusplus/draft. You could possibly add the link to isocpp.org/std/the-standard –  pepr Nov 15 '13 at 12:09
    
@ShafikYaghmour: Seems like they have locked it down (which generally means its an offical release). I have updated with links to the version that requires authentication (i.e you paid for it). –  Loki Astari Mar 7 at 1:37
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C99 is available online. Quoted from www.open-std.org:

The lastest publically available version of the standard is the combined C99 + TC1 + TC2 + TC3, WG14 N1256, dated 2007-09-07. This is a WG14 working paper, but it reflects the consolidated standard at the time of issue.

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You might find the draft international standard for C++0x useful.

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The FCD is available now. –  Roger Pate Apr 14 '10 at 17:47
    
Thanks - updated now –  James Hopkin Apr 16 '10 at 8:31
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ISO standards cost money, from a moderate amount (for a PDF version), to a bit more (for a book version).

While they aren't finalised however, they can usually be found online, as drafts. Most of the times the final version doesn't differ significantly from the last draft, so while not perfect, they'll suit just fine.

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You might find the cppreference site useful at http://www.cppreference.com/

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Draft Links:

C++11 N3337 (or N3242)

C11 N1570
C99 N1256

Drafts of the Standard are circulated for comment prior to ratification and publication.

Note that a working draft is not the standard currently in force, and it is not exactly the published standard

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The "N1169" link goes to a four-page document containing a few defect reports. It is not in any sense a draft of the C++ (or any other) standard. –  Gareth McCaughan Nov 13 '12 at 11:37
    
thanks for pointing it out... i have nixed the link... –  user1055604 Nov 14 '12 at 9:48
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The actual standards documents may not be the most useful. Most compilers do not fully implement the standards and may sometimes actually conflict. So the compiler documentation that you would already have will be more useful. Additionally, the documentation will contain platform-specific remarks and notes on any caveats.

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Compiler documentation is important, but knowing the language rather than knowing your implementation is much more. –  Spidey Jul 4 '12 at 16:03
    
With the actual standard you can find bugs in the compilers and help them to better follow the standard by patching them, by submitting bug reports or simply entering an IRC room and talking to someone who can fix it. –  hdante Mar 1 '13 at 3:49
    
@hdante -- absolutely. When you have the standard itself as the ideal, you can demand compatibility from the vendor. @/all -- The intention here was not to say the standard is not useful (FYI, going from the standard first is the approach I have taken in the past), but that you have to know your real world starting point as well, which hopefully is in-line with the standards. –  Kris Kumler Mar 1 '13 at 14:45
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The C89/90 and C++03 standards are available in book form from Wiley. C++ Standard on Amazon C Standard on Amazon

Plus, as already mentioned, the working draft for future standards is often available from the committee websites: C++ committee website C committee website

The C-201x draft is available as N1336, and the C++0x draft as N3225.

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Just a note about the print version for the C Standard from Wiley: it's the C99 standard, not C89/90. –  Michael Burr Sep 26 '08 at 22:14
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The ISO C and C++ standards are bloody expensive. On the other hand, the INCITS republishes them for a lot less. http://www.techstreet.com/ seems to have the PDF for $30 (search for INCITS/ISO/IEC 14882:2003).

Hardcopy versions are available, too. Look for the British Standards Institute versions, published by Wiley.

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Currently, techstreet.com has the C++2003 standard in PDF format for US$30, and the C++2011 standard for US$403. –  Keith Thompson Dec 9 '11 at 21:29
    
Thanks a lot for the link to Techstreet. ANSI.org's web shop wouldn't sell me the C11 standard (declining the credit card for "security" reasons, i.e., no good reason), while the equivalently-priced purchase (with the same card) at Techstreet went smoothly and without a hitch. –  Arto Bendiken May 22 '13 at 0:44
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The text of a draft of the ANSI C standard (aka C.89) is available online. This was standardized by the ANSI committee prior to acceptance by the ISO C Standard (C.90), so the numbering of the sections differ (ANSI sections 2 through 4 correspond roughly to ISO sections 5 through 7), although the content is (supposed to be) largely identical.

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Is it really the last draft? One difference I am aware of is that this draft specifies the range of tm_sec to be [0, 60], while C90 (incorrectly) [0, 61] –  Cubbi Aug 16 '13 at 22:46
    
@Cubbi, since I can't personally prove that it is, I modified the wording. Thanks. –  jxh Aug 16 '13 at 22:54
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For C/C++ you have to buy the standard to one of the organization supporting it. While it is very expensive to buy it via ISO, the same standard is quite cheap if bought from ANSI (~20$ for C++ standard).

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Don't forget the most recent standard for C - C11 (formerly C1X).

http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=57853

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Already mentioned in the accepted answer. –  Kay Apr 23 '12 at 17:43
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http://c0x.coding-guidelines.com/ contains a searchable, HTML-based version of the C standard. Actually, a slightly modified version:

This web site contains a modified version of N1256. It includes wording that has been deleted from C99 (i.e., in struck through form) and wording that does used to appear in C99 (i.e., in underlined form).

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protected by Bo Persson Jul 5 '12 at 12:00

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