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I'm trying to implement a subroutine that takes an array as its argument (or uses multiple arguments — still haven't quite grokked the difference), and returns true or false depending on whether that array is an increasing sequence (each number must be 1 more than the last):

isIncreasingArray(1,2,3,4); # true
isIncreasingArray(1,2,3,1); # false
isIncreasingArray(0,9,1);   # false
isIncreasingArray(-2,-1,0); # true
isIncreasingArray(1,1,1,1); # false

This is what I've come up with:

sub isIncreasingArray {

    my $last;

    foreach $n (@_) {
        return 0 if defined($last) && $last != $n - 1;
        $last = int($n);
    }

    return 1;

}

I'm quite new to Perl and am wondering if there's a simpler or more concise way of achieving this? Also, is what I've written in line with best practices?

share|improve this question
2  
Well-stated question Mr. 999. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 17 '11 at 11:35
    
Depend upon your purpose you may find helpful module. SerialNumber::Sequence –  aartist Nov 17 '11 at 21:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

A couple of points:

  1. For efficiency, especially to minimize memory footprint, you probably want to pass a reference to an array to the subroutine.

  2. In list context, return 0 will return a list consisting of a single element and thus will be true. a bare return suffices when you want to return false and does the job in all contexts.

It is probably possible to cut the number of comparisons in half by comparing the difference between the first and the last, the second and the second last etc. to see differences equal difference in indexes, but I am not thinking that clearly right now.

Here is a slightly different version based on yours. Note that you should use strict and make sure to scope your loop variable using my:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

use Carp qw(croak);
use Test::More;

ok(     isSimplyIncreasingSequence( [ 1298 ]  ) ); # true
ok(     isSimplyIncreasingSequence( [1,2,3,4] ) ); # true
ok( not isSimplyIncreasingSequence( [1,2,3,1] ) ); # false
ok( not isSimplyIncreasingSequence( [0,9,1]   ) ); # false
ok(     isSimplyIncreasingSequence( [-2,-1,0] ) ); # true
ok( not isSimplyIncreasingSequence( [1,1,1,1] ) ); # false

done_testing();

sub isSimplyIncreasingSequence {
    my ($seq) = @_;

    unless (defined($seq)
            and ('ARRAY' eq ref $seq)) {
        croak 'Expecting a reference to an array as first argument';
    }

    return 1 if @$seq < 2;

    my $first = $seq->[0];

    for my $n (1 .. $#$seq) {
        return unless $seq->[$n] == $first + $n;
    }

    return 1;
}

And, of course, some benchmarks:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );
use Carp qw( croak );

my %cases = (
    ordered_large => [1 .. 1_000_000],
    ordered_small => [1 .. 10],
    unordered_large_beg => [5, 1 .. 999_000],
    unordered_large_mid => [1 .. 500_000, 5, 500_002 .. 1_000_000],
    unordered_large_end => [1 .. 999_999, 5],
);

for my $case (keys %cases) {
    print "=== Case: $case\n";
    my $seq = $cases{$case};
    cmpthese -3, {
        'ref'  => sub { isSimplyIncreasingSequence($seq) },
        'flat' => sub {isIncreasingArray(@{ $seq } ) },
    };
}

sub isSimplyIncreasingSequence {
    my ($seq) = @_;

    unless (defined($seq)
            and ('ARRAY' eq ref $seq)) {
        croak 'Expecting a reference to an array as first argument';
    }

    return 1 if @$seq < 2;

    my $first = $seq->[0];

    for my $n (1 .. $#$seq) {
        return unless $seq->[$n] == $first + $n;
    }

    return 1;
}

sub isIncreasingArray {

    my $last;

    foreach my $n (@_) {
        return 0 if defined($last) && $last != $n - 1;
        $last = int($n);
    }

    return 1;

}
=== Case: unordered_large_mid
       Rate flat  ref
flat 4.64/s   -- -18%
ref  5.67/s  22%   --
=== Case: ordered_small
         Rate  ref flat
ref  154202/s   -- -11%
flat 173063/s  12%   --
=== Case: ordered_large
       Rate flat  ref
flat 2.41/s   -- -13%
ref  2.78/s  15%   --
=== Case: unordered_large_beg
       Rate flat  ref
flat 54.2/s   -- -83%
ref   315/s 481%   --
=== Case: unordered_large_end
       Rate flat  ref
flat 2.41/s   -- -12%
ref  2.74/s  14%   --
share|improve this answer
    
It would be interesting to see how my smart-match solution compares in the benchmark –  Zaid Nov 17 '11 at 16:38
    
@999, Sinan's use of an array ends up taking more memory than the yours, not less. (N items on the stack -vs- N items on the stack + 1 array + 1 ref + N items in the array). A function that is expected to return a scalar should not return an empty list. This leads to problems. I disagree with both of his tips. –  ikegami Nov 17 '11 at 18:22
    
You place them on the stack to put them in your array. –  ikegami Nov 17 '11 at 18:43
    
I guess I am more than a little confused. Are you comparing to passing a list of literals? I would not think that would be the common use case. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 17 '11 at 19:15

How come no one's come up with a smart-match solution?

While this one isn't as efficient as some of the other solutions, it has the added benefit of working with strings as well.

EDIT

Sub now returns true for empty and single-element lists because that's what the experts say it should do:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

sub is_simply_increasing { @_ < 2 || @_ ~~ [$_[0] .. $_[-1]] }

say (  is_simply_increasing(1,2,3,4)        ? 'true' : 'false' );  # true
say (  is_simply_increasing(1,2,3,1)        ? 'true' : 'false' );  # false
say (  is_simply_increasing(0,9,1)          ? 'true' : 'false' );  # false
say (  is_simply_increasing(-2,-1,0)        ? 'true' : 'false' );  # true
say (  is_simply_increasing(1,1,1,1)        ? 'true' : 'false' );  # false
say (  is_simply_increasing(1,4,1,-1)       ? 'true' : 'false' );  # false
say (  is_simply_increasing('a','c')        ? 'true' : 'false' );  # false
say (  is_simply_increasing('love'..'perl') ? 'true' : 'false' );  # true
say (  is_simply_increasing(2)              ? 'true' : 'false' );  # true
say (  is_simply_increasing()               ? 'true' : 'false' );  # true

I love it when my sub's a single-line!

share|improve this answer
    
Like that one a lot :) –  Dave Cross Nov 17 '11 at 17:07
    
fyi, the @{...} around the [...] is useless. –  ikegami Nov 17 '11 at 18:25
    
@ikegami : So it is! I failed to read the small-print in perlsyn: Note that the smart match implicitly dereferences any non-blessed hash or array ref, so the "Hash" and "Array" entries apply in those cases. (For blessed references, the "Object" entries apply.) –  Zaid Nov 17 '11 at 18:39
    
+1. I have to look up what smartmatch does each and every time so I tend not to use it. Vicious cycle, some might say. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 17 '11 at 18:44
    
This is why perl can be wtf. +1 for skill though. –  Callum Rogers Nov 17 '11 at 19:55

I ended up with something a little longer than yours. Which means, I suppose, that there's nothing wrong with your solution :)

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use Test::More;

sub is_increasing_array {
  return unless @_;
  return 1 if @_ == 1;

  foreach (1 .. $#_) {
    return if $_[$_] != $_[$_ - 1] + 1;
  }

  return 1;
}

ok(is_increasing_array(1,2,3,4));  # true
ok(!is_increasing_array(1,2,3,1)); # false
ok(!is_increasing_array(0,9,1));   # false
ok(is_increasing_array(-2,-1,0));  # true
ok(!is_increasing_array(1,1,1,1)); # false

done_testing;
share|improve this answer

Using a pre-6 "junction":

sub is_increasing_list { 
    use List::MoreUtils qw<none>;
    my $a = shift;
    return none { 
        ( my $v, $a ) = (( $_ - $a != 1 ), $_ ); 
        $v;
    } @_;
}

The none expression could also be written (more cryptically) as

return none { [ ( $a, undef ) = ( $_, ( $_ - $a - 1 )) ]->[-1]; } @_;

(If the constraint is that $x[$n+1] - $x[$n] == 1, then subtracting 1 makes a "Perl truth condition" as well.)

Actually come to think of it a 'none' junction operator is kind of backward to the concept, so I'll use the all:

sub is_increasing_list { 
    use List::MoreUtils qw<all>;
    my $a = shift;
    return all { [ ( $a, undef ) = ( $_, ( $_ - $a == 1 )) ]->[-1]; } @_;
}
share|improve this answer

Someone has to throw in the functional-programming solution here, since this sort of mathematical formula just begs for recursion. ;)

sub isIncreasingArray {
  return 1 if @_ <= 1;   
  return (pop(@_) - $_[-1] == 1) && isIncreasingArray(@_);
}

As for a subroutine argument being an array versus multiple arguments, think of it this way: Perl is always sending a list of arguments to your subroutine as the array @_. You can either shift or pop off arguments from that array as individual scalars, or otherwise operate on the whole list as an array. From inside your subroutine, it's still an array, period.

If you get into references, yes you can pass a reference-to-an-array into a subroutine. That reference is still technically being passed to your subroutine as an array (list) containing one scalar value: the reference. First I'd ignore all this and wrap your head around basic operation without references.

Calling the subroutine. This way, Perl is secretly converting your bare list of scalars into an array of scalars:

isIncreasingArray(1,2,3,4); 

This way, Perl is passing your array:

@a = (1,2,3,4);
$answer = isIncreasingArray(@a); 

Either way, the subroutine gets an array. And it's a copy*, hence the efficiency talk of references here. Don't worry about that for K<10,000, even with my ridiculously inefficient, academic, elegant, recursive solution here, which still takes under 1 second on my laptop:

print isIncreasingArray(1..10000), "\n"; # true

*A copy: sort of, but not really? See comments below, and other resources, e.g. PerlMonks. "One might argue that Perl always does Pass-By-Reference, but protects us from ourselves." Sometimes. In practice I make my own copies inside subroutines into localized "my" variables. Just do that.

share|improve this answer
    
It's NOT a copy. @_ contains the actual scalars passed to the sub. If you change them, they will be changed in the caller too. –  ikegami Nov 17 '11 at 18:31
    
Fair enough. I'll update my answer. Interesting this changes the original variable sub paramtest{$_[2]='X';} but this doesn't sub paramtest2{pop @_;}. –  IcarusNM Nov 17 '11 at 20:40
    
pop @_ doesn't change $_[2], it makes it accessible as $_[1]. It only changes @_ which doesn't exist in the caller, so it's no surprise that it has no effect on the caller. –  ikegami Nov 17 '11 at 22:03
    
Perl does always pass by reference. It does not protect us from ourselves. We protect ourselves by copying the values into lexical vars. –  ikegami Nov 17 '11 at 22:05
    
@ikegami: pop does normally alter the array, in addition to returning the last element of the array. Run this to see what I'm saying. The last line should be "1 2 3 4" if what you're saying is strictly true. sub p1 {$_[2]='X'} sub p2 {pop @_} @a = (1,2,3,4,5); print "Before p1: @a\n"; p1(@a); print " After p1: @a\n"; @a = (1,2,3,4,5); print "Before p2: @a\n"; p2(@a); print " After p2: @a\n"; –  IcarusNM Nov 17 '11 at 22:56

This is the shortest form I could come up to, check each element in a map to see if it is equal to the increased self, return a set of 0 and 1, count the 1 and match against the original size of the set.

print isIncreasingArray(1,2,3),"\n";
print isIncreasingArray(1,2,1),"\n";
print isIncreasingArray(1,2),"\n";
print isIncreasingArray(1),"\n";

sub isIncreasingArray {
  $i = $_[0];
  (scalar grep { 1 == $_ } map { $i++ == $_ } @_) == scalar(@_) || 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Whatever implementation you use, it wouldn't hurt to make some quick checks beforehand:

sub isSimplyIncreasingSequence {
   return 1 if @_ < 2;
   return 0 if $_[-1] - $_[0] != $#_;
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
return 1 if @_ < 2; would evaluate to true on an empty list. –  Zaid Nov 19 '11 at 20:09
1  
@Zaid That is the right thing to do. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuous_truth –  Sinan Ünür Nov 25 '11 at 14:07
    
@Zaid, Yes, as it should. An empty list is perfectly ordered. –  ikegami Nov 25 '11 at 17:32
    
That's an interesting way to look at it. I was thinking more along the lines of there being no list, so it cannot be ordered. –  Zaid Nov 25 '11 at 17:43
    
@Sinan Ünür, It was intentional, but that's not the reasoning I used. By your logic, I should return true for the inverse function isntSimplyIncreasingSequence(), but then it wouldn't be an inverse functions since the following wouldn't hold: isSimplyIncreasingSequence() == !isntSimplyIncreasingSequence(). I simply extended the function to give the only mathematically sound result for zero and one element lists, just like factorial was extended so that 0! gives the only possible sound result 1. –  ikegami Nov 25 '11 at 17:49

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