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I'm trying to write an extension method that, given a value, will return

  • The value itself if it's different from DBNull.Value
  • The default value for value's type

Yeah, that's not the clearest explanation, maybe some code will make what I'm trying to accomplish obvious.

public static T GetValueOrDefault<T>(this object value) {
    if (value == DBNull.Value)
        return default(T);
    else
        return (T)value;
}

As long as value's boxed type is the same as T, this method works correctly.

The real fun kicks in when the types are different, for instance the boxed value is byte and T is int.

Is there an elegant way to make this work?

Doing some typechecking manually to first cast from e.g. object to byte and then from byte to T, of course, won't work.

Edit

The proposed solution should work with enums too, not only with "standard" types.

share|improve this question
1  
This won't compile, default() requires a Type parameter, not a value. And can you show some sample code how you would like to achieve this? –  CodeCaster Nov 17 '11 at 11:42
1  
I just assumed the OP meant to write default(T). –  Christian Hayter Nov 17 '11 at 11:49
    
@CodeCaster Christian Hayter is right. Sorry, my bad. I'll fix it. –  s.m. Nov 17 '11 at 12:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Call your method with a type argument that exactly matches the database value, then cast it to what you actually want, e.g.

int result = (int) row["NullableByteColumn"].GetValueOrDefault<byte>();

I think this is reasonable because the code clearly separates the two different concepts that are at work here:

  • Reading a database value into the correct equivalent .NET data type.
  • Mapping the database access layer type into the required business logic layer type.

This separation of responsibility becomes more important if the required data type is something further removed from int and requires more complex translation, e.g. an enum, a string, or a day offset from a date.

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Thanks Christian, that's what I ended up doing before I posted the question. I was just wondering if there was a way to abstract the type cast away from the client code, or if doing that was acceptable. –  s.m. Nov 17 '11 at 13:10
    
I'm sure it's possible to abstract the cast away, but in my opinion that is not ideal because it hides the intent of the code. –  Christian Hayter Nov 17 '11 at 13:42
    
Thanks, I tend to agree. I'll accept this answer in a few hours, unless someone posts something groundbreaking. –  s.m. Nov 17 '11 at 13:43
    public static T GetValueOrDefault<T>(this object value) {
        if (value == DBNull.Value) {
            return default(T);
        }
        else {
            if (typeof(T).IsEnum) value = Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), Convert.ToInt64(value));
            return (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I might be doing something wrong, but this doesn't seem to work for me, it throws an InvalidCastException. –  s.m. Nov 17 '11 at 13:07
    
Hmm, hard to guess what the types of value and T are, don't make us guess. –  Hans Passant Nov 17 '11 at 13:22
    
In my code I'm dealing with enums too, and with enums it doesn't work (while it works like a charm for the byte to int case). –  s.m. Nov 17 '11 at 13:30
1  
Yes, enums are difficult to cast due to their underlying type. Post updated. –  Hans Passant Nov 17 '11 at 13:47
    
Gee, thanks, that works. –  s.m. Nov 17 '11 at 14:23

This works for me:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Byte myByte = 5;

        object myObject = (object)myByte;

        int myInt = myObject.GetValueOrDefault<Byte>();
        Console.WriteLine(myInt); // 5

        myObject = DBNull.Value;

        myInt = myObject.GetValueOrDefault<Byte>();
        Console.WriteLine(myInt); // 0

        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }
}

public static class ObjectExtension
{
    public static T GetValueOrDefault<T>(this object value)
    {
        if (value == DBNull.Value)
        {
            return default(T);
        }
        else
        {
            return (T)value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
And it works for me, too. But I came up with a counterexample (straight from the code I'm working with). Instead of a byte variable, try declaring a DataTable, adding a column and a row (containing (byte) 5), and then int myInt = dt.Rows[0]["foo"].GetValueOrDefault<int>();. The way in which the two examples differ eludes me, I'll admit. –  s.m. Nov 17 '11 at 13:37

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