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I have the following Interview question:

class someClass
{
    int sum=0;
    public void foo()
    {
        for(int i=0; i<100; i++)
        {
            sum++
        }
    }
}

There are two parallel threads running through the foo method. the value of sum at the end will vary from 100 to 200. the question is why. As I understand only one thread gets a cpu and threads get preempted while running. At what point can the disturbance cause the sum not reaching 200?

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Is this Java? Tag your question appropriately. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 17 '11 at 11:47
    
Side note: The interview question is wrong. The lowest possible value is 2. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 17 '11 at 11:49
    
@MarceloCantos: actually, to be strictly correct, the lowest possible value in the main memory (that is, the value that could be read by a third thread) is 0. –  Bruno Reis Nov 17 '11 at 21:08
    
@BrunoReis: How? –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 17 '11 at 21:44
    
Nothing in the snippet above guarantees that the value of sum will be commited to main memory. The updates might only occur in the threads' caches, and in this case another thread will see the default value for an int field, which is 0. A synchronized block would solve not only the atomicity problems, but also the visibility problems. –  Bruno Reis Nov 17 '11 at 22:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The line sum++ is a race condition.

Both threads can read the value of sum as say 0, then each increments its value to 1 and stores that value back. This means that the value of sum will be 1 instead of 2.

Continue like that and you will get a result between 100 and 200.

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1  
Your explanation is basically correct, except that the lowest possible value is 2, not 100. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 17 '11 at 11:51
    
Great! thanks a lot!!! –  mary Nov 17 '11 at 11:53
    
@mary no problem :) BTW, you can accept an answer by clicking the tick mark next to it. –  Nicholas Butler Nov 17 '11 at 12:02
1  
@NicholasButler: I assume that MarceloCantos means when the second thread for some reason gets interrupted just after reading 0 and doesn't get scheduled until the first thread is completely done. The second thread will increment the (stale) value (of 0) and the result would be 1. –  sehe Nov 17 '11 at 12:11
    
@sehe: The first rule of concurrent programming is that any interleaving that can happen will happen. BTW, the worst-case scenario isn't quite that simple, since the second thread still has a lot of incrementing to do after its first read ... the result is 2, not 1. See my answer for the details. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 17 '11 at 12:32

The increment isn't atomic. It reads the value, then writes out the incremented value. In between these two operations, the other thread can interact with the sum in complex ways.

The range of values is not in fact 100 to 200. This range is based on the incorrect assumption that threads either take turns or they perform each read simultaneously. There are many more possible interleavings, some of which yield markedly different values. The worst case is as follows (x represents the implicit temporary used in the expression sum++):

    Thread A            Thread B
----------------    ----------------
x     ← sum (0)
                    x     ← sum (0)
x + 1 → sum (1)
x     ← sum (1)
x + 1 → sum (2)
⋮
x     ← sum (98)
x + 1 → sum (99)
                    x + 1 → sum (1)
x     ← sum (1)
                    x     ← sum (1)
                    x + 1 → sum (2)
                    ⋮
                    x     ← sum (99)
                    x + 1 → sum (100)
x + 1 → sum (2)

Thus the lowest possible value is 2. In simple terms, the two threads undo each the other's hard work. You can't go below 2 because thread B can't feed a zero to thread A — it can only output an incremented value — and thread A must in turn increment the 1 that thread B gave it.

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Your last statement (2 is the lower limit) assumes, that increment and store are atomic instructions, right? That's platform dependent, I'd say. –  Patrick B. Nov 17 '11 at 12:59
    
@PatrickB. The increment is of a non-shared variable, it's atomic. The platform looks like Java, if so reads and writes of int are indivisible "actions" in Java Memory Model terms. –  chill Nov 17 '11 at 14:06
    
@PatrickB.: Store and load of full-size words is atomic on pretty much every platform you'll ever encounter; it's treated as a given in most work on concurrency. And, as chill points out, the increment is private, so the question of atomicity is moot. –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 17 '11 at 21:40
    
On platforms I've encountered so far (mostly small, specific-task CPUs) this was by far an assumption I could not do, hence my doubt here. In Java-context that might well be possible. –  Patrick B. Nov 17 '11 at 22:39
    
@PatrickB.: Are you saying that load/store of the natural word size (that's what I meant by full-size words) isn't atomic on some of the platforms you've worked on? –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 18 '11 at 1:37

Most CPU's have multiple cores now. So if we lock a mutex at the beginning of the function foo() and unlock the mutex after the for loop finishes then the 2 threads running on different cores will still yield the answer 200.

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