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Below is a script I used to test the split function after our systems seemed to be getting undefined data. This test fails roughly every 8 hours in IE but I have not seen it fail in Firefox or Chrome. The string in this test is representative of data used received from our web server. Our systems are primarily used with IE so I would be interested to know if there is anything that can be done to avoid this type of failure or is it simply down to the IE split implementation or memory management?

var test_string = "1^^0^^0.000^^0^^0.0^^0.0^^0^^0^^0.0000^^0^^0^^0^^1^^2^^47^^1000^^";
var good_array = [ "1", "0", "0.000", "0", "0.0", "0.0", "0", "0", "0.0000", "0", "0",     "0", "1", "2", "47", "1000", ""]
var test_count = 0;
var test_array = new Array(20);
var bad_split_count = new Array();
var bad_split_time = new Array();

function split_test ()
{

    test_array = test_string.split('^^');

    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    {   
        if (test_array[i] === good_array[i])
        {
            var good_item = true;
        }
        else
        {
            var d = new Date()
            bad_split_time.push(d);
            bad_split_count.push(test_count);
            break;
        }
    }

    test_count++;

    setTimeout(split_test, 5);
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you need bad_split_time and bad_split_count to rise in size? –  Tadeck Nov 17 '11 at 12:05
    
@Tadeck bad_split_time and bad_split_count are simply to keep a record of the failures in this test, they are not representative of anything in our system. –  Euan C Nov 17 '11 at 12:11

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