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Somehow fstream doesn't read my input from a file.

int main()
{
    ifstream fin("duomenys.txt");
    ofstream fout("rezultatas.txt");

    int n = 0;
    fin >> n;
    cout << n << endl;

    fout.close();
    fin.close();

    return 0;
}

duomenys.txt

24

The output here is 0. I can't figure out why this doesn't work..

share|improve this question
1  
what's in the file "duomenys.txt"? –  Nim Nov 17 '11 at 13:19
    
An integer. 24.. –  Marijus Nov 17 '11 at 13:20
1  
No need to explicitly close the files. They'll be closed when main returns. –  larsmans Nov 17 '11 at 13:20
    
fstream does read input. So... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 17 '11 at 13:21
2  
Check the state of the stream, to narrow down the problem. Almost certainly you do not have read access to a file at that path. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 17 '11 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The path is relative to the process's working directory, which may not be the same as the executable location.

Use an absolute path to confirm that you have a path issue, and then go on to find the proper relative path to use if you wish.

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If I use absolute path the output is the same. And the file is in the same directory as executable.. –  Marijus Nov 17 '11 at 13:25
    
Pretty sure I already said that the path of the executable has nothing to do with it. But if an absolute path doesn't work for you either, then I can't help. Improve your error handling to narrow down the issue. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 17 '11 at 13:26

Try this :

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main () {
  string line;
  ifstream myfile ("example.txt");
  if (myfile.is_open())
  {
    while ( getline (myfile,line) )
    {
      cout << line << endl;
    }
    myfile.close();
  }

  else cout << "Unable to open file"; 

  return 0;
}

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/files/

share|improve this answer
    
Why poor indentation? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 17 '11 at 13:21
    
There's no output at all.. –  Marijus Nov 17 '11 at 13:22
    
@TomalakGeret'kal Updated answer. –  Pheonix Nov 17 '11 at 13:23
1  
while (somestream.someflag()) { getline(..); dothingswithstring(); } is almost always wrong (including here). You'll dothingswithstring one too many times. Put the getline call in the loop condition. [Another example of cplusplus.com being a site to completely ignore.] –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 17 '11 at 13:25
1  
@Marijus: Then the path is wrong, or you do not have read permissions. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 17 '11 at 13:27

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