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first of all i'd like to say i've read the other post regarding php's mb_detect_encoding at Strange behaviour of mb_detect_order() in PHP. Which definitely reconfirm what i'd learn through trail and error. however there are still a few things that confusese me.

I'm building a html scrapers of mostly english sites that collects data and stores it into UTF-8 XML. I ran into a problem where a page self declares ISO-8859-1 charset, but it contains characters unique to Windows-1252. specifically the right single quote (’) 0x92. As I understand it, windows-1252 is a superset of iso-8859-1, which prompts me to think why bother using utf8_encode() at all ? why not just use iconv('Windows-1252', 'UTF-8', $str) in place of utf8_encode() since whatever is represented in iso-8859-1 would get converted as well as characters unique to windows-1252 (ie. €‚ƒ‘ ’ “ ”)

Also

$ansi = "€";//euro mark, the code file itself is in ansi

$detected = mb_detect_encoding($ansi, "WINDOWS-1252");// $detected == "Windows-1252"
$detected = mb_detect_encoding('a'.$ansi, "WINDOWS-1252");// $detected == FALSE
$detected = mb_detect_encoding($ansi.'a', "WINDOWS-1252");// $detected == "Windows-1252"
$detected = mb_detect_encoding($ansi.'a', "WINDOWS-1252",TRUE);// $detected == FALSE

why does this happen ? if first character in string is not windows-1252, even though the rest of it is, it fails ? Doesn't this behavior make it pretty useless ? as far as distinguishing iso-8859-1 and windows-1252

the other thing that was confusing to me was, say I want to detect charset between ASCII, ISO-8859-1, windows-1252, UTF-8. Is it possible to detect strings in such a way that gives me the lowest ranking set ? (ie.

$ascii = "123"; // desired detect result == 'ASCII'
$iso = "é".$ascii; // desired detect result == 'ISO-8859-1'
$ansi = "€".$iso; // desired detect result == 'Windows-1252'
$utf8 = file_get_contents('utf8.txt', true);//$utf8 == '你好123é€', desired detect result == 'UTF-8'

shouldn't my $detect_order = array('ASCII', 'ISO-8859-1', 'Windows-1252','UTF-8'); I know this is incorrect as it gave me the following results

$ascii == 'ASCII'
$iso   == 'ISO-8859-1'
$ansi  == 'ISO-8859-1'
$utf8  == 'ISO-8859-1'

why is my detect order of ('ASCII', 'ISO-8859-1', 'Windows-1252','UTF-8') wrong for what I want to get ?

the closest desired return value i got was

$ascii == 'ASCII'
$iso   == 'ISO-8859-1'
$ansi  == 'ISO-8859-1'
$utf8  == 'UTF-8'

both of the following mb_detect_order array gave me the above values

$detect_order = array('ASCII', 'UTF-8', 'Windows-1252', 'ISO-8859-1');
$detect_order = array('ASCII', 'UTF-8', 'ISO-8859-1', 'Windows-1252');

this is confusing the heck out of me !

phew, can someone shed some light on this ? thanks alot appreciated it !

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3 Answers 3

Not sure if I will answer all of your questions, but here we go:

As I understand it, windows-1252 is a superset of iso-8859-1, which prompts me to think why bother using utf8_encode() at all ? why not just use iconv('Windows-1252', 'UTF-8', $str) in place of utf8_encode() since whatever is represented in iso-8859-1 would get converted as well as characters unique to windows-1252

You shouldn't bother with ut8_encode. Go to iconv() or mb_convert_encoding. ut8_encode converts only ISO-8859-1 to UTF-8. if you need to convert between different encodings, you should use other functions.

With respect to Euro mark. Not sure if this got added (officially or unofficially) to the ISO-8859-1 at some point but both of the statement below return true

$ansi = "€";//euro mark, the code file itself is in ansi

$detected = mb_detect_encoding($ansi, "WINDOWS-1252", TRUE);// $detected == "Windows-1252"
echo $detected."<br/>-<br/>";
$detected = mb_detect_encoding($ansi, "ISO-8859-1", TRUE);// $detected == ISO-8859-1
echo $detected."<br/>-<br/>";


$detected = mb_detect_encoding($ansi, "WINDOWS-1252");// $detected == "Windows-1252"
echo $detected."<br/>-<br/>";
$detected = mb_detect_encoding($ansi, "ISO-8859-1");// $detected == ISO-8859-1
echo $detected."<br/>-<br/>";

Notice, it's the result with strict set to True or False. That might explain why

shouldn't my $detect_order = array('ASCII', 'ISO-8859-1', 'Windows-1252','UTF-8'); I know this is incorrect as it gave me the following results

gives you ISO-8859-1. I noticed you switched UTF-8, ahead of ISO in the latter order an that's why it gave you UTF-8 at the end.

why is my detect order of ('ASCII', 'ISO-8859-1', 'Windows-1252','UTF-8') wrong for what I want to get ?

Per php's site http://us3.php.net/manual/en/function.mb-detect-order.php, setting ISO before UTF-8 will always return ISO. Check their Useless detect order example.

From what I've seen, it seems that if you have both ISO-8859-1 and Windows-1252 in there, you'll get ISO back. If you take one or the other out, you'll get whatever is left from the two. So the positioning of the last 2 below doesn't seem to make a difference

$detect_order = array('ASCII', 'UTF-8', 'Windows-1252', 'ISO-8859-1'); $detect_order = array('ASCII', 'UTF-8', 'ISO-8859-1', 'Windows-1252');

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Alexey thx for response! actually $ansi = "€‚ƒ„…†‡ˆ‰Š‹ŒŽ‘’“”•–—˜™š›œžŸ";// all chars unique to windows-1252. $utf8 = '你好123é€';//file_get_content from UTF8 charset file $detected = mb_detect_encoding($utf8, "ISO-88591, UTF-8"); Expecting $detected == "UTF-8", since ISO-8859-1 is single byte and cant map MB chars like chinese chars. Yet like you said PHP website states the opposite. I'm confused about why this is ? How to distinguish between ISO-8859-1 vs. UTF-8 ? what is the proper detect order if not "ISO-88591, UTF-8" ? any other order would be counter intuitive no ? –  george H Nov 18 '11 at 5:59
    
@GeorgeH, put UTF-8 before ISO in your detect order and the $utf8 string you have will be detected as UTF-8. Ex: $utf8="你好123é€"; $detect_order = array('UTF-8', 'ISO-8859-1'); $detected = mb_detect_encoding($utf8, $detect_order);// $detected == "UTF-8" –  Alexey Gerasimov Nov 18 '11 at 13:26
    
I know this is an old thread, but it was helpful to me with a recent situation. The order is important because windows-1252 and ISO-8859 will match almost any byte string except possibly in the control-character range. UTF-8 has more strict rules and should be checked for first, but it only seems to work correctly if you use strict=true in mb_detect_encoding. Also, ASCII is a subset of the other three standards and may not be that useful for detection. –  gordonwd Dec 4 '12 at 15:17
    
Basically gordonwd is right, but in PHP, Windows-1252 will almost never be detected, because as soon as your text contains any characters outside of 0x80 to 0x9f, it counts as invalid Windows-1252. This means that if your string contains a normal ASCII letter like "A", or even a space character, PHP will say that this is not valid Windows-1252. This is a PHP bug, see bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=64667. –  scy Apr 23 at 13:49
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It's a known bug.

Windows-1251 and Windows-1252 will only succeed if the entire string consists of high-byte characters in a certain range. That means you'll never get the right conversion because the text will appear as ISO-8859-1 even if it is Windows-1252.

I ran into this problem converting from LATIN1 to UTF-8. I had many contents pasted from Microsoft Word and stored in a VARCHAR field using LATIN1 charset of a MySQL table. As you probably know Word converts apostrophes and quotes to smart apostrophes and curly quotes. None of them would display on screen, because those chars weren't properly converted. The text was always identified as ISO-8859-1. To solve the problem I forced the conversion from Windows-1252 to UTF-8 and both, apostrophes and quotes (and other characters) were properly converted.

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the € symbol is not part of utf8 encoding!

you have to put it as €!

or encode to windows-1252 or iso-8859-15 (same thing than iso-8859-1 but has € symbol)

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