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I have this piece of code in Python:

if 'a' in my_list and 'b' in my_list and 'c' in my_list:
    # do something
    print my_list

Is there a more pythonic way of doing this?

Something like (invalid python code follows):

if ('a', 'b', 'c') individual_in my_list:
    # do something
    print my_list
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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted
if set("abc").issubset(my_list):
    # whatever
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thanks a lot for the answer. As I told Jochen, it's going to be tough to pick between your answer and his. So I will pick whichever got more up votes in the next 20 minutes. Thanks again! –  Pablo Santa Cruz Nov 17 '11 at 14:58
    
Also: if set("abc") <= set(my_list): pass –  Austin Marshall Nov 17 '11 at 15:52
    
this has my vote for superior answer –  jterrace Nov 17 '11 at 17:14
    
if set('a','b','c').issubset(my_list) is the more general form. –  Ethan Furman Nov 18 '11 at 18:04
    
@Ethan: Yes, as long as you put in another pair of parens. :) –  Sven Marnach Nov 19 '11 at 1:02
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The simplest form:

if all(x in mylist for x in 'abc'):
    pass

Often when you have a lot of items in those lists it is better to use a data structure that can look up items without having to compare each of them, like a set.

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More specifically, if you have a lot of items in the ('a', 'b', 'c') iterable, a set is the better choice. The number of items in my_list does not matter. –  Sven Marnach Nov 17 '11 at 14:54
    
What is elem supposed to be in this example? Generates NameError: "global name 'elem' is not defined". I assume it's meant to be x –  Cixate Nov 17 '11 at 14:57
    
@Jochen Ritzel: thanks a lot for the answer and clarification. It's going to be tough to pick between your answer and Sven's. So I will pick whichever got more up votes in the next 20 minutes. Thanks again! –  Pablo Santa Cruz Nov 17 '11 at 14:57
    
@Cixate: That's been a typo, and your assumption is right. –  Sven Marnach Nov 17 '11 at 15:00
    
In if all(x in mylist for x in candidates): it's the length of the candidates that doesnt matter, as you have to loop over each element in it no matter what. The x in mylist test becomes slower the longer mylist gets (in the worst case where all candidates are at the end of the list), to the point where converting mylist to a set first will be faster. –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 17 '11 at 15:13
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You can use set operators:

if set('abc') <= set(my_list):
    print('matches')

superset = ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd')
subset = ('a', 'b')
desired = set(('a', 'b', 'c'))

assert desired <= set(superset) # True
assert desired.issubset(superset) # True
assert desired <= set(subset) # False
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