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I am trying to get data from one row in a table into three rows in a temp table, so I can update the data based on values in a different, and I am wondering if there is a better approach than doing a UNION operation.

Here is the basic UNION syntax that gets the data from one row into the three rows I want:

    (SELECT 
    0 as lead_id,
    'RV' as lead_type,
    '' as lead_serial,
    rv_amplitude as amplitude,
    rv_pulse_width as pulse_width,
    rv_sensitivity as sensitivity
    FROM program_parameters WHERE event_id = 33636)
    UNION
    (SELECT
    0 as lead_id,
    'LV' as lead_type,
    '' as lead_serial,
    final_amplitude as amplitude,
    final_pulse_width as pulse_width.
    final_sensitivity as sensitivity
    FROM program_parameters WHERE event_id = 33636)
    UNION
    (SELECT
    0 as lead_id,
    'ATRIAL' as lead_type,
    atrial_amplitude as amplitude,
    atrial_pulse_width as pulse_width,
    atrial_sensitivity as sensitivity
    FROM program_parameters WHERE event_id = 33636)

so that my final data is a three row table with columns.

The only key value I have to get this data is the event_id, and there is only one row per event_id in the table.

Is there a better way to get this data into separate rows other than a UNION operation?

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

UNION is the right solution here.

This is what you need to use when you want to have separate result sets as one set.

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I totally agree! –  Cape Cod Gunny Nov 17 '11 at 16:30
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Possibly a slight improvement:

 SELECT 0 as lead_id,
        lead_type,
        '' as lead_serial,
        case lead_type
            when 'RV' then rv_amplitude
            when 'LV' then final_amplitude
            when 'ATRIAL' then atrial_amplitude
        end as amplitude,
        case lead_type
            when 'RV' then rv_pulse_width
            when 'LV' then final_pulse_width
            when 'ATRIAL' then atrial_pulse_width
        end as pulse_width,
        case lead_type
            when 'RV' then rv_sensitivity
            when 'LV' then final_sensitivity
            when 'ATRIAL' then atrial_sensitivity
        end as sensitivity
 FROM (SELECT 'RV' as lead_type union SELECT 'LV' UNION SELECT 'ATRIAL') dummy
 CROSS JOIN program_parameters 
 WHERE event_id = 33636

(Very similar to Jhonny's, but using an inline view instead of a temporary table.)

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The best solution seems to be the Union, however, you can try using a table variable and a cross join

DECLARE @t TABLE (lead_type VARCHAR(10))
INSERT INTO @t VALUES ('LV')
INSERT INTO @t VALUES ('RV')
INSERT INTO @t VALUES ('ATRIAL')

SELECT 0 as lead_id,
t.lead_type as lead_type,
'' as lead_serial,
CASE t.lead_type 
  WHEN 'LV' THEN rv_amplitude 
  WHEN 'RV' THEN final_amplitude 
  WHEN 'ATRIAL' THEN atrial_amplitude
END as amplitude,
CASE t.lead_type 
  WHEN 'LV' THEN rv_pulse_width
  WHEN 'RV' THEN final_pulse_width
  WHEN 'ATRIAL' THEN atrial_pulse_width
END as pulse_width,
CASE t.lead_type 
  WHEN 'LV' THEN rv_sensitivity
  WHEN 'RV' THEN final_sensitivity
  WHEN 'ATRIAL' THEN atrial_sensitivity
END as sensitivity
FROM program_parameters
CROSS JOIN @t t
WHERE event_id = 33636
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How will this help with getting the different columns to show one under the other? –  Oded Nov 17 '11 at 15:10
    
OK. How is your update better than the OP's option? –  Oded Nov 17 '11 at 15:15
    
Well... honestly I don't know... :D ... but I think the union will incur in 3 SELECTS over the same row –  Jhonny D. Cano -Leftware- Nov 17 '11 at 15:21
    
@Oded, the condition(s) on selection from program_parameters are now present once instead of 3 separate places - this would make it slightly easier to maintain than the OP's query. –  Mark Bannister Nov 17 '11 at 15:55
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Assuming you mean temp table in the conventional sense... UNION operations involve resolving duplicate rows. The use of literals in your table expression means it will have no duplicate rows, therefore you could use three separate INSERT statements.

...however, you may mean a derived table, CTE, etc.

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I ended up changing this slightly, then joining on a second table to get the serial number and other values, after adding the lead_area (lead_type from my original question became lead_area, due to another column named lead_type) column to the second table.

CREATE PROCEDURE usp_IcdLeadProgramming( @encounterID INT, @patientID INT ) AS BEGIN

-- Create temp table for final results.
CREATE TABLE #tmp(
    lead_area VARCHAR(10),  
    amplitude FLOAT, 
    pulse_width FLOAT, 
    sensitivity FLOAT)

-- Get the values out of the program_parameters table record
INSERT INTO #tmp
SELECT 
        'RV' as lead_area, 
        rv_amplitude as amplitude, 
        rv_pulse_width as pulse_width, 
        rv_sensitivity as sensitivity 
FROM    program_parameters 
WHERE   event_id = @encounterID 
UNION
SELECT 
        'LV' as lead_area, 
        final_amplitude as amplitude,
        final_pulse_width as pulse_width,
        final_sensitivity as sensitivity
FROM    program_parameters 
WHERE   event_id = @encounterID
UNION
SELECT 
        'ATRIAL' as lead_area, 
        atrial_amplitude as amplitude,
        atrial_pulse_width as pulse_width,
        atrial_sensitivity as sensitivity
FROM    program_parameters 
WHERE   event_id = @encounterID


-- Get the current leads and join to the values.
SELECT 
        l.lead_id,
        l.lead_type,
        l.lead_serial, 
        l.lead_system, 
        l.lead_location,
        ll.lead_area,
        t.amplitude,
        t.pulse_width,
        t.sensitivity
FROM    
        leads l
INNER JOIN 
        lead_location_type ll
ON      l.lead_location = ll.lead_location_code
INNER JOIN #tmp t
ON      ll.lead_area = t.lead_area
WHERE   l.patient_id = @patientID 
AND     lead_removal_date IS NULL 
AND     ll.lead_area IS NOT NULL 

DROP TABLE #tmp

END
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