Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following classes. An error occurs during the for loop in the Main class. The compiler complains about the draw function "is of non-type GLCommand". The idea of the application is to store many different types of GLCommand and Shape within the same vector. Should I take a different design approach, or is their a simple fix to this problem?

Interface:

class GLCommand
{
    public:
        GLCommand();
        virtual ~GLCommand();
    virtual void draw() = 0;
};

Abstract Class:

class Shape : public GLCommand
{
public:
  Shape(int);
  virtual ~Shape();
  virtual void draw() {};
private:
  double colour[];
  int sides;

};

Derived class:

class Polygon : public Shape
{
  public:
    Polygon(int sides);
    virtual ~Polygon();

    void draw();

private:
  vector<Coordinates *> verticies;

};

Main:

int main()
{
    vector <GLCommand*> vec;
    Polygon p(4);

    vec.push_back(&p);

    for (vector<GLCommand*>::iterator it = vec.begin(); it!=vec.end(); ++it)
    {
      *it->draw();
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your question title doesn't match your code. You have a vector of pointers, not of "abstract classes". –  Kerrek SB Nov 17 '11 at 15:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Nothing you said is relevant; the problem is just operator precedence:

(*it)->draw();
share|improve this answer
    
Oops! Thanks you. –  johnnyturbo3 Nov 17 '11 at 15:57
    
Would it be possible to explain to me why the parentheses are required here? The only time I've seen a pointer dereferenced like this is when you use the dot notation to call a member function eg: (*ptr).foo(); –  johnnyturbo3 Nov 17 '11 at 16:12
    
The dereference-operator simply has lower precedence than the -> member access operator, so *it->x is *(it->x), and not (*it)->x. Similarly, *ptr.foo() is *(ptr.foo()), not (*ptr).foo(). –  Kerrek SB Nov 17 '11 at 16:36

Put parentheses in the right place:

(*it)->draw();

Or, to avoid these issues, use boost::ptr_vector when your container carries ownership of its objects.

share|improve this answer

As others have noted its precedence.

But you can use the STL algorithms to achieve the affect you need much easier:

std::for_each(vec.begin(), vec.end(), std::mem_fun(&GLCommand::draw));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.