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I'm looking to license some code I've worked on.

What I hope to achieve is.

  • Code is free to use in other open source projects
  • Code can be used in non-open source projects, as long as any modifications/imrpovements/additions/or other changes to the code are made available back to the open source community, without causing non-open source code to also be made available.

I'm leaning towards and LGPL license, yet I'm curious how to actually go about doing this.

I've looked at http://www.gnu.org/licenses/lgpl.html for information on LGPL and also looked at http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-howto.html.

What I'd like to know is: - Is LGPL the best license for what I'm trying to achieve? - Is there a place I can find specific wording I need to place in my code to license it as LGPL

Reading through how to license on GNU's page I came across this wording.

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
(at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

Reading through How to use GNU licenses documentation, this text is what confuses me. "All programs, whether they are released under the GPL or LGPL, should include the text version of the GPL." I'm curious if below will suffice for a LGPL license.

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by 
the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
(at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
GNU Lesser General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
and GNU Lesser General Public License
along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
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closed as off topic by Ken White, Jim Lewis, Erno de Weerd, Gilles, animuson Mar 22 '12 at 0:26

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Do you have a splash screen or something? Put a button on it that says "Licenses" and when you click that you pop up a list of the licensed code you used, including your licenses.

Seems too easy, what I am not understanding?

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