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I can call Get<int>(Stat); or Get<string>(Name);

But when compiling i get Cannot implicitly convert type'int' to 'T' and the same thing for string

public T Get<T>(Stats type ) where T : IConvertible
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
    {
        int t = Convert.ToInt16(PlayerStats[type]);
        return t;
    }
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
    {
        string t = PlayerStats[type].ToString();
        return t;
    }
}
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3  
You are probably thinking that the if block checked that T is int, so within the block, you know T is int and you should be able to implicitly convert int to T. But the compiler is not designed to follow that reasoning, it just knows that generally T does not derive from int, so it doesn't allow the implicit conversion. (And if the compiler supported it, the verifier wouldn't, so the compiled assembly would be unverifiable.) –  JGWeissman Nov 17 '11 at 20:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Any time you find yourself switching on a type in a generic you are almost certainly doing something wrong. Generics should be generic; they should operate identically completely independent of the type.

If T can only be int or string then don't write your code this way at all in the first place. Write two methods, one that returns an int and one that returns a string.

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1  
Could you elaborate on when this would go wrong? –  Matthijs Wessels Dec 23 '11 at 19:27
    
Get<Car> where car implements IConvertible will cause breakage. When someone sees you have a generic method they will assume they can pass in anything that implements IConvertible. –  Tjaart Sep 26 '12 at 5:54
    
I can only partially agree with you, @Eric .I have a situation where I have to parse arrays stored in XML-tags.The problem is that the specification that the XML document follows(COLLADA in my case) says that such arrays can be not only float,int and bool but also some custom types.However in case you get a float[](array-tags contain the type of stored data in their names:float_array stores floats) you need to parse the string as an array of floats, which requires some IFormatProvider to be used).I obviously cannot use "T.Parse(...)".So for a small subset of cases I need to use such switching. –  rbaleksandar Jul 30 '13 at 12:55

You should be able to just use Convert.ChangeType() instead of your custom code:

public T Get<T>(Stats type) where T : IConvertible
{
    return (T) Convert.ChangeType(PlayerStats[type], typeof(T));
}
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2  
Thank you that works perfectly –  David W Nov 17 '11 at 17:24

ChangeType is probably your best option. My solution is similar to the one provided by BrokenGlass with a bit of try catch logic.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    object number = "1";
    bool hasConverted;
    var convertedValue = DoConvert<int>(number, out hasConverted);

    Console.WriteLine(hasConverted);
    Console.WriteLine(convertedValue);
}

public static TConvertType DoConvert<TConvertType>(object convertValue, out bool hasConverted)
{
    hasConverted = false;
    var converted = default(TConvertType);
    try
    {
        converted = (TConvertType) 
            Convert.ChangeType(convertValue, typeof(TConvertType));
        hasConverted = true;
    }
    catch (InvalidCastException)
    {
    }
    catch (ArgumentNullException)
    {
    }
    catch (FormatException)
    {
    }
    catch (OverflowException)
    {
    }

    return converted;
}
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public T Get<T>(Stats type ) where T : IConvertible
{
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
    {
        int t = Convert.ToInt16(PlayerStats[type]);
        return t as T;
    }
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
    {
        string t = PlayerStats[type].ToString();
        return t as T;
    }
}
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1  
return (T) t; because no null checks are necessary. –  BoltClock Nov 17 '11 at 17:20
1  
if condition check no null –  Reza ArabQaeni Nov 17 '11 at 17:26
    
Ha! +1: I had a different issue but the return t as T solved it for me. Thx. –  Code Chops May 25 at 15:35

Considering @BrokenGlass logic (Convert.ChangeType) does not support for GUID type.

public T Get<T>(Stats type) where T : IConvertible
{
    return (T) Convert.ChangeType(PlayerStats[type], typeof(T));
}

Error: Invalid cast from 'System.String' to 'System.Guid'.

Instead, use below logic using TypeDescriptor.GetConverter by adding System.ComponentModel namespace.

public T Get<T>(Stats type) where T : IConvertible
{
    (T)TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T)).ConvertFromInvariantString(PlayerStats[type])
}

Read this.

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It looks like you need a TypeConverter, see this blog entry.

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