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#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i;
    int x;
    int y;
    for (x = 1; x <= 5; x++)
    {
        for (y = 1; y <= 5; y++)
        {
            i = 7848 + y * (-29412 + y * (23130 + y * (-6660 + y * 630)))
                    + x * (-16668 + y * (56629 + y * (-44066 + y * (12612 + y * -1186))))
                    + x * x * (11910 + y * (-35522 + y * (27183 + y * (-7696 + y * 717))))
                    + x * x * x * (-3420 + y * (9204 + y * (-6844 + y * (1908 + y * -176))))
                    + x * x * x * x * (330 + y * (-826 + y * (597 + y * (-164 + y * 15))));
            printf("%2d ", i/72);
        }
    printf("\n");
    }
}

The output is:

        1  2  3  4  5
        16 17 18 19 6
        15 24 25 20 7
        14 23 22 21 8
        13 12 11 10 9

What mathematic basis is behind this code?

EDIT: I know this code is useless and worthless, and can't be used in any other way. I am just curious about the mathematical basis behind this code...

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closed as too localized by Kiril Kirov, Shane MacLaughlin, Shawn Chin, Noufal Ibrahim, Conrad Frix Nov 17 '11 at 18:23

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1  
Ammmmm... What? –  Kiril Kirov Nov 17 '11 at 17:30
    
Not really sure what the point of the question is, it looks like a bunch of math, thas all –  Dan F Nov 17 '11 at 17:31
    
Sorry I forgot to add an output! –  SHH Nov 17 '11 at 17:31
    
Well... naively, you could assume that the value at each cell (x, y) is a polynomial in x and y, and then just solve for the coefficients. –  Kerrek SB Nov 17 '11 at 17:32
2  
Pft, it's just arithmetic, what's so complicated? IMO, someone didn't have anything to do, and decided to come up with something complicated (at first sight) that does nothing special and can be done in 3 rows, much, much, much more effective. –  Kiril Kirov Nov 17 '11 at 17:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This looks like someone's attempt to do something simple in a deliberately complicated way.

For each cell, it is calculating a polynomial in x and y. The value at each cell is a sum of terms aijxiyj for all 0<=i<=4 and 0<=j<=4.

To calculate the coefficients aij of the polynomial, you can substitute the values of x and y and the desired result for each cell. You'd get 25 linear equations with 25 variables, which can be solved with basic linear algebra.

Note that this method has nothing to do with the result being a spiral pattern: It could be used to print any result, the coefficients would just be different.

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Thank you very much! –  SHH Nov 17 '11 at 17:48
    
That is certainly a way to solve it, but unless the perpetrator took the trouble to group the terms after obtaining the required polynomial, I think the OP shows another way of solving this. –  Jacob Nov 17 '11 at 17:48
    
hm.. I am not sure whether the author grouped the terms intentionally to obfuscate the code, or maybe he used another way of solving this (which will group the terms as above in the process). –  SHH Nov 17 '11 at 17:52
    
@Jacob: The terms are grouped in the OP, but that's just another way of writing the same thing. The coefficients will still be the same, and they are the important part. –  interjay Nov 17 '11 at 17:57
    
@interjay: Yes of course ; my point was that the polynomial could have been derived using another method. –  Jacob Nov 17 '11 at 20:38

The result of this code is as follow:

  1  2  3  4  5 
 16 17 18 19  6
 15 24 25 20  7 
 14 23 22 21  8 
 13 12 11 10  9 

It looks indeed like numbers follow a snail pattern, but it does not work for square size greater, nor smaller. (change 5 to 7 or 3 gives bad results)

I guess it is just "pure luck", or more simply specific obfuscated code to print that pattern, but there is no mathematic basis behind that, as much as I can see.

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