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I'm trying to add some error checking inside my PHP script. Is it valid to do this:

if (!mkdir($dir, 0)) {
    $res->success = false;
    $res->error = 'Failed to create directory';
    echo json_encode($res);
    die;
}

Is there a better way to exit the script after encountering an error like this?

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in ajax call, i normally use exit(); –  racar Nov 17 '11 at 18:03
1  
@racar there is no difference between die and exit stackoverflow.com/questions/5825002/… PHP DOC –  Neal Nov 17 '11 at 18:05
2  
@Neal, you can do exit(1) but die will always return 0 –  racar Nov 17 '11 at 18:08
2  
@racar they are exactly the same! see here: php.net/manual/en/function.die.php –  Neal Nov 17 '11 at 18:15
2  
i was wrong, but i still prefer exit. Die is too violent ^^ Thx Neal –  racar Nov 17 '11 at 18:20
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

That looks fine to me.

You can even echo data in the die like so:

if (!mkdir($dir, 0)) {
    $res->success = false;
    $res->error = 'Failed to create directory';
    die(json_encode($res));
}
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Just learned about the die(json_encode('whatever goes here')); THANK YOU> –  cooking good Nov 27 '13 at 18:44
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Throwing a exception. Put code into a try catch block, and throw exception when you need.

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1  
Why use an exception when die is simpler? This is not the case where to use exceptions handler. –  Jefffrey Nov 17 '11 at 18:05
3  
it's for separation of concerns. A low-level function should not deal with output. What if you now re-use the function as part of a console utility? Using exceptions allows you to handle the error at the appropriate layer. –  Martin Samson Nov 17 '11 at 18:14
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PHP has functions for error triggering and handling.

if (!mkdir($dir, 0)) {
    trigger_error('Failed to create directory', E_USER_ERROR)
}

When you do this the script will end. The message will be written to the configured error log and it will also be displayed when error_reporting is enabled.

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