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The code below introduces a class C. The class has constructor, copy constructor, operator= and one member. How can I get the address of the object created by C(2) in the function main()?

#include <iostream>

class C
{
public:
    int a;

    C(const C &other)
    {   
        std::cout << "Copy Constructor:" << a << std::endl;
    }   

    C(int a)
    {   
        this->a = a;
        std::cout << "Constructor:" << a << std::endl;
    }   

    C &operator=(const C &other)
    {   
        std::cout << "operator=:this.a = " << a << " | other.a = " << other.a << std::endl;
        a = other.a;
        return *this;
    }   

    ~C()
    {   
        std::cout << "Destructor:" << a << std::endl;
    }   
};

    int main()
    {
        C a(1);

        a = C(2);
    }
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What are you trying to do with the address? –  cpx Nov 17 '11 at 18:08
    
Nothing, just for fun. –  Beginner Nov 17 '11 at 18:13
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't. You are forbidden from taking addresses of temporaries. They will go out of scope very quickly, leaving you with an invalid address.

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Agreed. You can hack it with pastebin.com/ufGtBZ9Y but as you can see, the d-tor will be called immediately after the assignment and you will still need to compile with -fpermissive or the compiler won't let you do this. –  Erbureth Nov 17 '11 at 18:16
    
Can you please point me to an authorative source that confirms your statemets? Also do you mean that this temporary object can disappear before closing }? –  Beginner Nov 17 '11 at 18:16
    
Here you can see the code with the destruction order: pastebin.com/fvTEycTb –  Erbureth Nov 17 '11 at 18:17
    
@RomanB: In this case, my gcc is my authorative source (with its error saying error: taking address of temporary). And yes, a temporary object can disappear before the end of its enclosing block. –  thiton Nov 17 '11 at 18:18
    
Thank you guys, you are awesome! –  Beginner Nov 17 '11 at 18:19
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You could use a helper function to write the address somewhere before the object goes out of scope:

template <typename T>
T const & store_possibly_invalid_address(T const & t, T const *& p)
{
    p = &t;
    return t;
}

int main()
{
    C a(1);
    C const * invalid_address;
    a = store_possibly_invalid_address(C(2), invalid_address);

    // The temporary is out of scope, but you can see where it was.
    // Don't dereference the pointer.
}

That could be educational, to discover where the compiler chooses to put temporaries. It has no purpose in any real code, though.

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The only way is with some collaboration inside the class; the constructor has the address (the this pointer), and can put it somewhere where you can get at it later. I'd recommend against it, though, since the object won't live long enough for you to do much with it. (On the other hand, it's sometimes useful for debugging to output it.)

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