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I'm trying to use stl sort() in a class function. I would like to sort an array of structs that look like this:

struct foo{
    double num;
    std::string s;
};

with a comparison function like this:

bool aGreaterThanb(foo a, foo b){
    if (a.num > b.num){
        if(a.num == b.num){
            if (anotherOutsideComparison(a.s, b.s)){
                return true;
            }
        }
        else
            return true;
    }
    else
        return false;
}

But I'm not sure how I can format this to get it to compile. How should I format this so I can call sort(fooarray[0], fooarray[end], aGreaterThanb);? (An example would be great)

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1  
It should work as is. You just have a syntax error in your code (You are missing a close brace '}' after the return true). To me this is a good reason to line up the open and close braces. –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '11 at 18:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It works just as you want already:

#include <algorithm>
int main()
{
    foo     data[10];
    std::sort(&data[0], &data[10], aGreaterThanb);
}

But you have syntax error. You are missing a brace:

        return true;
} // <--- Missing this line
else
    return false;

For efficiency you should pass by const reference:

bool aGreaterThanb(foo const& a, foo const& b){
share|improve this answer
    
the last index of the declaration foo data[10] is 9, so, your statement should be std::sort(&data[0], &data[9], aGreaterThanb); –  Sergio Moura Nov 17 '11 at 18:33
3  
@Sergio Moura: No. The std algorithms require the end point of a range to be one past the end of the range. Just like begin() will give you the first element and end() will give you one past the end &data[10] is one past the end. This is explicitly allowed by the standard and required when you use the standard algorithms on a normal array. –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '11 at 18:35
    
Living and learning. Thanks for the clarification =) –  Sergio Moura Nov 17 '11 at 18:40
    
Actually OP is missing a semicolon after true as well. –  KennyTM Nov 17 '11 at 20:46

Write your comparison function as the operator() method of a structure called a functor:

struct aGreaterThanb
{
    bool operator() (const foo& a, const foo& b)
    {
        // return true iff a is strictly less than b according to your ordering
    }
};

Then pass an instance of that functor object to std::sort:

std::sort(fooarray.begin(), fooarray.end(), aGreaterThanb());
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2  
hidden point: pass by reference to avoid copying the arguments on each invocation –  sehe Nov 17 '11 at 18:16
2  
Functions work fine in std::sort(). Personally I would prefer to a use a functor (like you) but the code above can be used without change (when the syntax error is fixed). See below. –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '11 at 18:21
    
This answer seems like overkill since he doesn't need state. All he has to do it change to pass-by-reference. –  Mooing Duck Nov 17 '11 at 18:25
    
The question doesn't mention anything about STL-containers, so .begin() .end() would not work. –  Kleist Nov 17 '11 at 18:26
    
@Mooing Duck: And fix his syntax error (The OP I mean). –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '11 at 18:27

If you are using an array of foo like this:

foo fooarray[Foos];
...
sort(fooarray, fooarray + Foos, &aGreaterThanb);

The above code would sort your array in reverse order, since sort expects a less-than comparator.

Additionally to avoid copying a lot of foo-objects around just for comparison, declare your comparator to take const foo& instead of foo as arguments.

bool aGreaterThanb(const foo& a, const foo& b) {
share|improve this answer

You're supposed to pass iterators — a generalized superset of pointers — to the STL sort function:

std::sort(fooarray, fooarray + end, &aGreaterThanb);
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Doesn't std::sort expect a less-than function anyway, not a greater-than function? I think that will be a problem... –  Platinum Azure Nov 17 '11 at 18:16
    
@PlatinumAzure: It will just sort the array in descending order. Probably this is OP's intention. –  KennyTM Nov 17 '11 at 18:17
    
@PlatinumAzure: As long as the function/functor provides a strict weak ordering between elemenets it should work correctly. –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '11 at 18:24
    
Well, I'm just saying it might surprise the user if s/he provides a greater-than function and sort expects a less-than function. As KennyTM points out, it will result in a descending sort. Ascending sort is by far the more common preference. –  Platinum Azure Nov 17 '11 at 20:36

Note that in worst case sort function is up to N^2 comparsions. And stable_sort complexity is between N*logN and N*(LogN^2)

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Make it an operator.

struct foo {
    double num;
    std::string s;
};

bool operator>(const foo& a, const foo& b) {
    return (
        (a.num > b.num) ||
        ((a.num == b.num) &&
        anotherOutsideComparison(a.s, b.s))
    );
}

// note: std::sort expects operator<
bool operator<(const foo& a, const foo& b) {
    return b > a;
}

If you really want to sort using operator>, pass std::greater<foo>() as the functor.

std::sort(foos.begin(), foos.end(), std::greater<foo>());
share|improve this answer
    
!(a > b) means a <= b. Perhaps you mean b > a. –  KennyTM Nov 17 '11 at 18:26
    
@KennyTM: Right. –  Cat Plus Plus Nov 17 '11 at 18:27
    
Or even b > a. –  Mike Seymour Nov 17 '11 at 18:27
    
@MikeSeymour: right. –  KennyTM Nov 17 '11 at 18:30
    
I think your first && should be || –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '11 at 18:31

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