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I'm trying to become an object-oriented coder here, so I'm giving myself some simple tasks.
I built a class that displays all the images in a given directory. That worked fine, so I separated that class into two classes, one to read the filenames in the directory and pass them into an array, and one to parse that array and display the pictures. The method in the child class is exactly the same as it was when it was in the parent class (except of course substituting parent:: for this->).

Now it seems when I instantiate the child class and call its method, nothing happens at all.

Classes:

class Picfind
{
   public function findPics($dir){
       $files = array();
       $i=0;
       $handle = opendir($dir);
       while (false !== ($file = readdir($handle))){
           $extension = strtolower(substr(strrchr($file, '.'), 1));
           if($extension == 'jpg' || $extension == 'gif' || $extension == 'png'){
                // now use $file as you like
                $i++;
                $files['file' . $i] = $file;
           }
       }
       return $files;
    }
}

class DisplayPics extends Picfind
{

    function diplayPics($dir) 
    {
        echo 'displayPics method called';

        foreach(parent::findPics($dir) as $key => $val) {
            echo '<img src="' . $dir . $val . '" img><br/>';
        }
    }
}

Instantiation:

include("class.picFind.php");
$Myclass = new DisplayPics();
$Myclass->displayPics('./images/');
share|improve this question
    
You have your whole design wrong. While hakre certainly gave you a better design, you still could use some improvement. See my post below for details. –  Levi Morrison Nov 17 '11 at 19:30
    
You didn't even considered the other answers. Know that there is not one right design. –  Matthieu Napoli Nov 17 '11 at 20:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You wrote that you want to learn object oriented programming. What about the following:

class PicFinder
{
   /**
    * @return array
    */
   public function inDirectory($directory)
   {
       return // array of files
   }
}

class PicPresentation
{
    public function present(array $pictures)
    {
        // your presentation code
    }
}


$path = '/your/path';
$datasource = new PicFinder();
$presentation = new PicPresentation();
$pictures = $datasource->inDirectory($path);
$presentation->present($pictures);

Keep things separated and loosely coupled. One object should be responsible for one thing, e.g. one object to obtain the list of pictures from a directory and another one for the presentation. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, thank you. I was going step by step turning something procedural into something object oriented and was hoping to end up with something like you have there. –  user783261 Nov 17 '11 at 19:28
    
Good advice, but I'm going to add another route. –  Levi Morrison Nov 17 '11 at 19:42
    
Thanks so much. I ended up doing something very similar, but also passing the directory into the values in my array of file names, so that when I call on that array as an object anywhere else, I can work with its values anywhere. I also moved the functionality that parses the file extensions into the display method, so that I can use the first class to return an array of file names. I guess for practice I'll separate that functionality into its own class as well, and make it so the user can pass an argument that will determine which types of files will be displayed. –  user783261 Nov 17 '11 at 19:57
    
Instead of the array you can create a PictureCollection that contains that base path or whichever other meta-information you need as well next to the array of pictures. –  hakre Nov 17 '11 at 19:59
    
Honestly, you are recreating existing behavior already defined in PHP. See my answer for an option that allows you to get ANY data from the file, including size, full path, path without name, etc. –  Levi Morrison Nov 17 '11 at 20:15

To be honest: your whole design is wrong.

  1. DisplayPics shouldn't inherit from Picfind. Honestly, either have Picfind have a display method, or have DisplayPics take the output from Picfind. Think, does the following make sense: "DisplayPics is a PicFind."? If not, it's probably wrong.
  2. Classes normally aren't verbs. A better name would be Pictures, with find and display methods. In your case, you are finding something in a directory, which leads to the next point:
  3. You should make use of the PHP DirectoryIterator class. This way, you can do whatever you'd like with the files you find. You'll have all the information about the file available to you, and it's integrated nicely with PHP.
  4. You need a separation of concerns. This is what hakre's suggestion is all about. Reducing dependencies and decoupling things is normally helpful.

/**
 * ExtensionFinder will find all the files in a directory that have the given
 * extensions.
 */
class ExtensionFinder extends DirectoryIterator {

    protected $extensions =  array();

    public function __contruct($directory) {
        parent::__construct($directory);

    }

    /**
     * Sets the extensions for the iterator. 
     * @param array $extensions The extensions you want to get (without the dot).
     */
    public function extensions(array $extensions) {
        $this->extensions = $extensions;
    }

    /**
     * Determines if this resource is valid.  If you return false from this 
     * function, the iterator will stop.  
     * @return boolean Returns true if the value is a file with proper extension.
     */
    public function valid() {
        if (parent::valid()) {
            $current = parent::current();

            if ($current->isFile()) {
                //if the extensions array is empty or null, we simply accept it.
                if (isset($this->extensions) && count($this->extensions)>0) {
                    //otherwise filter it
                    if (in_array($current->getExtension(), $this->extensions)) {
                         return true;
                    } else {
                        parent::next();
                        return $this->valid();
                    }
                } else {
                    return true;
                }
            } else {
                parent::next();
                return $this->valid();
            }
        } else {
            return false;
        }

    }
}

class PictureFinder extends ExtensionFinder {
    public function __construct($directory) {
        parent::__construct($directory);

        $this->extensions = array (
            'jpg',
            'gif',
            'png'
        );
    }
}

How to use:

$iterator = new PictureFinder('img/');
foreach($iterator as $file) {
    //do whatever you want with the picture here.
    echo $file->getPathname()."\n";
}    

Note that you could use the ExtensionFinder class I defined above to find files of ANY extension. That could potentially be more useful than simply finding images, but I defined a PictureFinder class for you for that specific use-case.

share|improve this answer

$Myclass->displayPics('./images/'); is calling the constructor and nothing is happening. You have a typo in your function name aswell.

share|improve this answer
    
What constructor? Is there a constructor by default? Would it be the constructor of the parent or child class? –  user783261 Nov 17 '11 at 19:14
    
php has 2 conventions for constructors. __construct or the class name. So a class called 'test' will have a constructor of 'test' –  Lylo Nov 17 '11 at 19:18

I'd suggest that design instead:

class PicFinder
{
    public function findPics($dir){
       ...
    }
}

class PicDisplayer
{
    protected $picFinder;

    public function __construct() {
        // Default pic finder
        $this->setPicFinder(new PicFinder());
    }

    public function diplayPics($dir)  {
        echo 'displayPics method called';

        foreach($this->getPicFinder()->findPics($dir) as $key => $val) {
            echo '<img src="' . $dir . $val . '" img><br/>';
        }
    }

    protected function setPicFinder(PicFinder $picFinder) {
        $this->picFinder = $picFinder;
    }
    protected function getPicFinder() {
        return $this->picFinder;
    }
}

That way you only use PicDisplayer and don't care how it finds the pics. But you can still change the "PicFinder" if needed, by extending the PicFinder class and implementing a specific behavior.

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