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I'm building an image gallery which present a few images in the frontpage. The images are larger than the actual size displayed in the frontpage, which leads me to the following question:

If cache is not an option, what would be better:

  1. Using php to shrink the image and send it to the client.

  2. Send the original full size image and let the client shrink it (with simple width and height attributes)

I tend to think that the second is a better solution, but I'd like to hear more opinions.

Thanks!

Edit:

When people upload the images, I create thumbnails for them to be displayed when browsing the site.

The "cache is not an option" reason:

The discussed images are 5 "featured" images in the frontpage which will not stay the same for more than an hour max. so isn't it a waste to create another image copy of every uploaded image just for that?

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Why can't you cache? –  kba Nov 17 '11 at 19:13
    
See original post (edited) please –  tamir Nov 17 '11 at 19:20
    
@tamir: That depends - e.g., how much traffic are you expecting within the hour? –  Piskvor Nov 17 '11 at 21:13
    
No, it absolutely isn't a waste. Just resize and cache the image the first time it's accessed. In the long run, you'll save resources. Caching the image one time isn't as resource heavy as constantly reading it and resizing it. After the hour has passed, just wipe the five cached images. –  kba Nov 17 '11 at 22:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Essentially, it depends on

  • What's the original-to-desired width/height ratio? It's not a big deal serving a 500x500 image and showing it as 250x250, but wasting bandwidth on 1920x1080 images is. Also, mobile devices might not have enough resources available to actually display the webpage if you serve too many big images.
  • What do you have more of: bandwidth or CPU power? Can you make sure nobody uses your on-the-fly resizer as DOS target?

Generally solutions with a cache, even a very temporary one, are much better though.

[AD edit]

The discussed images are 5 "featured" images in the frontpage which will not stay the same for more than an hour max. so isn't it a waste to create another image copy of every uploaded image just for that?

It is. But you could simply create a separate folder for these thumbnails, and setup a cron job to wipe files older than an hour. Here's an example I use on my site (set to 30 minutes):

*/15 * * * * find /var/www/directory/ -mmin +30 -exec rm -f {} \; >/dev/null 2>&1

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Given 'enough' CPU ressources I would prefer to shrink images before sending them to go easy on people with bad connections and mobile devices.

Another option and my preferred strategy would be to keep smaller versions of the images and then use them. If the images are uploaded at some point, then create a smaller version of the image on upload.

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It kind of depends on your flow, but I would resize them on-the-fly and save the thumb. So if the thumb exist, serve it, if not resize on the fly and serve that (while saving the thumb).

Then in a cronjob you can remove old images.

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How about 3. don't resize the images in the process that's supposed to serve them to client - make a background process do the resizing, send the thumbnails if resized, full images if not yet. This has the advantage that you can throttle the resizing process independently of the user requests.

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