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I use a Concurrency::concurrent_unordered_map successfully in my program (this is an implementation made by Microsoft). This is needed because multiple inserts/updates for elements and quite rare deletes are performed in a concurrent manner.

I know that this container (like all other concurrent containers) provides an unsafe erase() method - for erasing a node.

What would you think would be the best approach to make the erase process also thread safe ? This happens rarely as I've said (only because user intervention) and I would not like so much to have a critical section that has to be entered every time I perform a search on the container (or for that matter any other operations like iterator traversal and node updates). What do you think? I was also thinking on an event based mechanism but I don't see how this is applicable here.

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Lock the section with a mutex, erase from the container, unlock. –  Kerrek SB Nov 17 '11 at 19:49
    
The only problem with the mutex is that it seems that I have to include in the same mutex all other updates that are made on the container: so all the inserts, iterator traversal, updates on the elements have to be guarded by the same mutex. I'd rather prefer another solution –  Ghita Nov 17 '11 at 19:59
    
Well, you'll have to wrap the erase function into some sync_erase(), and guarantee that clients only call that function. Then you put the mutex only in there. –  Kerrek SB Nov 17 '11 at 20:02
    
But then I will have to put sync_erase() also in functions like: iter FindElement(key); InsertElement(key, value); UpdateElement(iter, value) ... basically seems like every operation that touches the concurrent container should be guarded. Do we really need this or is there something more clever than this ? –  Ghita Nov 17 '11 at 20:06
1  
Perhaps take a look at lock free hash tables? Check erdani.com/publications/cuj-2004-10.pdf & erdani.com/publications/cuj-2004-12.pdf , although I wouldn't go down this path unless I could find a stable one available already. –  Ylisar Nov 17 '11 at 20:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually the involvement of a critical section to make the erase process concurrent safe defeats the purpose of using a concurrent container at all in my case. If one would use such an approach every operation that relates to the concurrent container would have to be guarded by the same lock (i.e. operations that until now wouldn't have had to step on each others toe now have to wait on the same critical section). So this is by far the worst idea that renders your concurrent container useless in every situation that you might use it.

An idea that addresses the mentioned inconveniences would be to use a Reader Writer lock. This allows shared reads but exclusive writes. One should protect the deletes with a writer lock and every other operation on the map with a reader lock like this:

    InsertOperation(key) -- this inserts the key in case is not present (and constructs a default constructed value)
    {
       reader_writer_lock::scoped_lock_read guard(reader_writer_lock);
       ...
    }

    value Find(key)
    {
        reader_writer_lock::scoped_lock_read guard(reader_writer_lock);
        ...
     }

     void EraseElement(key)
     {
        reader_writer_lock::**scoped_lock** guard(reader_writer_lock);
        ...
     }
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1  
Insert is read operation? –  Dani Nov 18 '11 at 5:50
    
Actually yes, in the sense that traversal, iterator access, inserts are all concurrent safe in this container –  Ghita Nov 18 '11 at 5:54
    
@Dani. I've corrected the Insert signature, because what it actually does is to insert a key/value in the hash container in case the key is not present –  Ghita Nov 18 '11 at 5:58
    
I was refering to the implementation of this container from : archive.msdn.microsoft.com/concrtextras/Release/… –  Ghita Nov 18 '11 at 6:03

Another solution that should work quite all right I think would be to fire an Event when entering EraseElement(key) and resetting at procedure finish. This way every other operation would have to wait on that event before proceeding. I think that this would likely offer the same level of performance as my previous solution.

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And another article on the subject of concurrent data structures: Lock-Free Data Structures with Hazard Pointers by Andrei Alexandrescu and Maged Michael

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