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I'm implementing a variant class (not using boost) and I'm wondering how you'd handle the case where you'd store any of string, integer, or double and automatically convert it accordingly to desired type through ToString(), ToInt(), or ToDouble().

For example,

Variant a = 7;
cout << "The answer is" + a.ToString() << endl; // should print "The answer is 7"
a = "7.4";
double &b = a.ToDouble();
b += 1;
cout << a.ToString() << endl; // should print 8.4

ToXXX functions should return the reference of the type that you want to convert to. Right now, I have the code where it can return the same type as it was initially assigned to( Variant a = Int(7); a.ToInt() works) and raise exception when the assigned type is different from the one that you want to convert to.

Sorry using boost isn't an option.

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1  
A bit hard to tell without having any idea how you are implementing it. –  UncleBens Nov 17 '11 at 20:00
    
I have custom types String, Int, Double that all derives from a base object class. a.ToDouble() would actually return Double but I did override cast operator for Double that would actually return reference for the double. –  JosephH Nov 17 '11 at 20:05
    
@MooingDuck: Sure you can. Think Boost.Any. - I suspect that the answer might be that you'd need to implement conversion to each of those types in each of the String, Int and Double classes. –  UncleBens Nov 17 '11 at 20:26
    
@UncleBens: for some reason I assumed the string/int/double were local to the object. I'm not sure why I assumed that. Seems silly in hindsight. –  Mooing Duck Nov 17 '11 at 20:34
    
variant is designed as a typesafe version of a union, in order to work with different types in a uniform manner, it's not intended for reinterpretation. –  Gene Bushuyev Nov 17 '11 at 22:48

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted
    #include <string>
    #include <iostream>
    class Variant{
    public:
        Variant(){
            data.type = UNKOWN;
            data.intVal = 0;
        }
        Variant(int v){
            data.type = INT;
            data.intVal = v;
        }
        Variant(double v){
            data.type = DOUBLE;
            data.realVal = v;
        }
        Variant(std::string v){
            data.type = STRING;
            data.strVal = new std::string(v);
        }
            //the missing copy constructor
             Variant(Variant const& other)
             {
                *this = other;// redirect to the copy assignment
              }

        ~Variant(){
            if(STRING == data.type){
                delete data.strVal;
            }
        }

        Variant& operator = (const Variant& other){
            if(this != &other)
            {
                if(STRING == data.type){
                    delete data.strVal;
                }

                switch(other.data.type){
                case STRING:{
                        data.strVal = new std::string(*(other.data.strVal));
                        data.type = STRING;
                        break;
                    }
                default:{
                        memcpy(this, &other, sizeof(Variant));
                        break;
                    }           
                }
            }
            return *this;
        }
        Variant& operator = (int newVal){
            if(STRING == data.type){
                delete data.strVal;
            }
            data.type = INT;
            data.intVal= newVal;
            return *this;
        }

        Variant& operator = (double newVal){
            if(STRING == data.type){
                delete data.strVal;
            }
            data.type = DOUBLE;
            data.realVal= newVal;
            return *this;
        }

        Variant& operator = (std::string& newVal){
            if(STRING == data.type){
                delete data.strVal;
            }
            data.type = STRING;
            data.strVal= new std::string(newVal);
            return *this;
        }
        operator int&() {
            if(INT == data.type)
            {
                return data.intVal;
            }
            //do type conversion if you like
            throw std::runtime_error("bad cast");
        }

        operator double&()  {
            if(DOUBLE == data.type){
                return data.realVal;
            }
            //do type conversion if you like
            throw std::runtime_error("bad cast");
        }
        operator std::string&() {
            if(STRING == data.type){
                return *data.strVal;
            }
            throw std::runtime_error("bad cast");
        }
    private:
        enum Type{
            UNKOWN=0,
            INT,
            DOUBLE,
            STRING
        };
        struct{
            Type type;
            union 
            {
                int intVal;
                double realVal;
                std::string* strVal;
            };
        } data;
    };


    int main(){
        Variant v("this is string");//string
        v=1;//int
        v=1.0;//double
        v=std::string("another string");//
        Variant v2; //unkown type
        v2=v;//string
        std::cout << (std::string&)v2 << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }    
share|improve this answer
    
this is a simplified version from my product code. Hope that helps. –  BruceAdi Nov 25 '11 at 7:20
    
This is dangerous, it is missing a copy-constructor that mimics the assignment operator. See the en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_three_(C++_programming) –  user401925 Nov 28 '11 at 11:23
    
@JulianRaschke you're right. it's a simplified version. We should add the copy constructor, anyway –  BruceAdi Nov 28 '11 at 11:47
1  
The copy constructor is still not safe because *this has completely uninitialized members at the time of assignment. If type happens to be STRING, this will go wrong. –  user401925 Nov 28 '11 at 16:50

To implement something like this, you need to be able to change the stored type, because if the user changes the variable by reference, he wants the change to affect the value stored, so I'd write something like this:

class Variant
{
private:
    enum StoreType
    {
        Integer,
        Float,
        String,
    }
    store_type;

    union
    {
       int * as_integer;
       double * as_double;
       std::string * as_string;
    }
    store_pointer;

    // convert to type
    void integer_to_double();
    void integer_to_string();
    void double_to_integer();
    void double_to_string();
    void string_to_integer();
    void string_to_double();

public:

...

    int & ToInt()
    {
        switch (store_type)
        {
            case Integer: break;
            case Double: double_to_integer(); break;
            case String: string_to_integer(); break;
        }
        return * as_integer;
    }

...

}
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1  
I don't think I'd recommend String as an enum value. Most people either prefix or postfix the enum type. StringType or something. –  Mooing Duck Nov 21 '11 at 22:40

I have implemeted a simple variant class myself (without using third-party libs). Each of the ToXxx functions contains a switch over m_type (enum that indicates the type currently being held). For string conversion (both from and to) I use std::stringstream. It's trivial, really. Pretty much like Mooing Duck suggested.

P. S. If frequent calling of string conversion for the same value is intended, I'd cache it.

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First, do you absolutely need to return by reference? Returning by value would probably be easier, since you could do that at any time without having to change the internal state of the Variant object.

If you absolutely do need to return by reference, then you need to have a valid memory location to return a reference to. (So for example, returning a reference to a stack object is no good, because the stack object would be gone when the ToXXX() method returns, and the reference would be a reference to invalid memory)

The easy way to do that would be to include a (mutable?) member variable of each type in your Variant object, and set that member variable's value and return a reference to it as necessary. Of course that downside of that is that it makes your Variant objects as large as the sum of all the possible objects, but that might be okay if you don't care much about memory usage.

If you do care about minimizing memory usage of your Variant objects also, then you'll probably need to use a union (or something equivalent to one). C unions will work for POD types, but if you need to include non-POD types (e.g. std::string objects) they won't be sufficient. If you need that, you can go with a byte-buffer (that is large enough for the largest possible type to fit into) and using placement-new and explicit destructor calls when necessary, but it is a bit fiddly to implement.

As far as the actual conversions of data types go (e.g. "7" -> (int)7 -> (double)7.0, you'll simply have to implement logic (perhaps via nested switch statements?) to do the right thing for each possible pair of "source" and "destination" types. I don't think there is any magic way around that, short of using boost functionality where it has been done for you.

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This is the only way I can think of, if you want to be able to do conversions on the fly.

class Variant {
    enum internaltype {stringtype, inttype, doubletype} curtype;
    std::string strdata; //can't be in union
    union {
        int intdata;
        double doubledata;
    };
public:
    Variant() :curtype(inttype) {}
    Variant(const std::string& s) : curtype(stringtype), strdata(s) {}
    Variant(int i) : curtype(inttype) {intdata = i;}
    Variant(double d) : curtype(doubletype) {doubledata = d;}

    std::string& ToString() {
        std::stringstream ss;
        switch(curtype) { 
        case inttype: 
                      ss << intdata;
                      ss >> stringdata;
                      break;
        case doubletype: 
                      ss << doubledata;
                      ss >> stringdata;
                      break;
        }
        curtype = stringtype;
        return &strdata;
    }
    int& ToInt() {/*much the same*/}
    double& ToDouble() {/*much the same*/}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Evan Dark's variation is smaller, and doesn't have the union complexities that mine has. Do that instead. –  Mooing Duck Nov 21 '11 at 22:41

Here's a quick and dirty implementation using boost::any as the value holder instead of custom classes. As you can see, templates can help a bit to keep the amount of code somewhat shorter.

ToXXX functions change the underlying type of the stored value (unless no actual conversion is required), then return a reference to it. Conversions are done using boost::lexical_cast, which may not be entirely suitable for your purposes (it will throw exceptions if the conversions are not successful according to lexical_cast's very strict conditions).

#include <boost/any.hpp>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include <string>
#include <typeinfo>

class Variant
{
    boost::any value;
public:
    Variant(int n): value(n) {}
    Variant(double d): value(d) {}
    Variant(const std::string& s): value(s) {}
    Variant(const char* s): value(std::string(s)) {} //without this, string literals create ambiguities

    int& ToInt() { return convert<int>();}
    double& ToDouble() { return convert<double>(); }
    std::string& ToString() { return convert<std::string>(); }

private:
    template <class T>
    T& convert()
    {
        if (typeid(T) != value.type()) { //otherwise no conversion required
            if (typeid(int) == value.type()) {
                value = boost::lexical_cast<T>(boost::any_cast<int>(value));
            }
            else if (typeid(double) == value.type()) {
                value = boost::lexical_cast<T>(boost::any_cast<double>(value));
            }
            else if (typeid(std::string) == value.type()) {
                value = boost::lexical_cast<T>(boost::any_cast<std::string>(value));
            }
        }
        return *boost::any_cast<T>(&value);
    }
};

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    Variant a = 7;
    cout << "The answer is" + a.ToString() << endl; // should print "The answer is 7"
    a = "7.4";
    double &b = a.ToDouble();
    b += 1;
    cout << a.ToString() << endl; // should print 8.4
}

(In action: http://codepad.org/C3l5AXg3)

The implementation might be even more straightforward with boost::variant<int, double, std::string>, as you might be able to pull it off with a single visitor with templated operator() instead of having to write a separate code path for each of the different types.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a bad idea to make ToSomething() functions mutating in general. Neither it's viable design approach, e.g. Variant v("abc"); v.ToDouble();. –  Gene Bushuyev Nov 17 '11 at 22:52
    
@Gene: Yes, it may be a bad idea, but that's what you have to do in order to meet the requirements from the example usage code. - As to the counter-example, this will just throw an error (bad_lexical_cast, but you may catch and replace it with your own error). What else would a class designed like this do? –  UncleBens Nov 17 '11 at 22:58
    
I'm not saying the other solutions are better, I'm saying any solution is bad because the design requirements are flawed. –  Gene Bushuyev Nov 17 '11 at 23:18
    
@Gene: Yes, I'd agree with that. –  UncleBens Nov 18 '11 at 18:32
    
boost::lexical_cast<T> won't compile on VS2010. Sadly it seems you must have an explicit target type to avoid no acceptable conversion errors. –  AJG85 Nov 22 '11 at 18:38

Given what you need I would suggest downloading http://qt.nokia.com and looking into an implementation of QVariant Class. If that seems overly complicated I would suggest something like this:

class Variant
{
private:
    enum data_type {
     ...
    };

    data_type variant_type;

    union Data {
       char *string;
       int integer;
       double dbl;
    } data;

public:
    Variant(const int data);
    Variant(const double data);
    Variant(const char *data);

    //  I think that implementation of the constructors should be pretty straight forward.

    int ToInt() const; 
    double ToDouble() const; 
    std::string ToString() const;
};

The implementation of the conversion should be straightforward from here.

If you want it simpler and the performance is not of a major concern the data stored in the variant could be converted to a string and then converted back when the To method is called.

class Variant
{
private:
    char data_string[16384];

public:
    Variant(const int data);
    Variant(const double data);
    Variant(const char *data);

    //  I think that implementation of the constructors should be pretty straight forward.

    int ToInt() const; 
    double ToDouble() const; 
    std::string ToString() const;
};

If you need implementation details for the conversion functions I can provide them but I think that they should be pretty straight forward.

share|improve this answer
    
Your To-methods should return references (and that make the whole topic a lot more complicated since changing the reference should change all the representations.) –  Kleist Nov 23 '11 at 21:15
    
True enough but I personally don't see a reason to make it that much more complicated then it needs to be. The only return that a reference return would be advantageous for is strings. –  Karlson Nov 24 '11 at 5:26
    
You should read the question again. It is a requirement that the stored value can be changed by modified the returned reference. –  Kleist Nov 26 '11 at 0:29

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