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In ARC, does it create a memory leak to alloc into a @property (strong)

// MyClass.h
@property (strong) NSString *myString;

// MyClass.m
@synthesize myString=_myString;

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    self.myString = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"Test %@", otherString];
}

I know that in manual memory management, the equivalent would create a leak

// MyClass.h
@property (retain) NSString *myString;

// MyClass.m
@synthesize myString=_myString;

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    self.myString = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"Test %@", otherString];
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [_myString release];
}

Is ARC able to handle the top example correctly? Does it optimize away one of the retains? Or maybe release twice in the dealloc?

share|improve this question
    
Actually your manual memory management code has a leak. [[NSString alloc] init...] returns an object with a retain count of 1. Assigning it to self.myString uses the compiler-generated setter which retains it, giving it a count of 2. In dealloc, you release it once, giving it a retain count of 1. Its retain count never goes to zero so it is never deallocated. –  rob mayoff Nov 17 '11 at 21:01
4  
Yes, that was my point in showing the comparison. –  bearMountain Nov 17 '11 at 21:04
    
@robmayoff this is not a memory leak under ARC. ARC will insert a release at the end of viewDidLoad. –  Christopher Pickslay Nov 17 '11 at 21:18
1  
Oops. I totally missed "the equivalent would create a leak" for some reason. –  rob mayoff Nov 17 '11 at 21:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

This is perfectly valid under ARC.

I would recommend reading the ARC documentation to get more comfortable with trusting what it has to offer. http://clang.llvm.org/docs/AutomaticReferenceCounting.html and Mike Ash has a great blog post on how it works http://www.mikeash.com/pyblog/friday-qa-2011-09-30-automatic-reference-counting.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply. How do you know this? (So that I know where to look in the documentation in the future) –  bearMountain Nov 17 '11 at 20:40
5  
Because the whole point of ARC is Automatic Reference Counting. The changes to the language were made exactly to enable the compiler to precise lifespan of every object. If the compiler can't prove the lifespan of an object, it'll warn you. To put it another way: If the compiler cannot generate code that provably does not leak or over-release, then it will warn. –  bbum Nov 17 '11 at 20:51
1  
ARC knows that once you stop referencing the created object it can be released. ARC is not magic, it just adds retain/release automatically, what you would have had to add manually before, so you can just program. –  NJones Nov 17 '11 at 20:57
1  
Automatic Reference Counting section 4.2: For __strong objects, the new pointee is first retained; second, the lvalue is loaded with primitive semantics; third, the new pointee is stored into the lvalue with primitive semantics; and finally, the old pointee is released. –  rob mayoff Nov 17 '11 at 21:03
    
Also relevant: Transitioning to ARC Release Notes. –  Peter Hosey Nov 17 '11 at 23:08

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