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230215 01/16/2000 57533 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217623

230215 01/18/2000 77659 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217624

230215 01/25/2000 76583 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217625

230215 01/29/2000 58082 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217626

230216 01/14/2000 50020 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217627

230216 01/18/2000 66444 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217628

230216 01/19/2000 51330 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217629

All of the fields are separated by spaces, I need to store this into a 2d array. There are actually 5 million lines like these. For example, i would want to store this into an array like $arr[7][11], because there are 7 lines and 11 values in each line.

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8  
Please post what you have tried, and people will be more inclined to help, rather than simply do your work :) – Igor Nov 17 '11 at 20:43
2  
I am sceptical to whatever you are attempting by loading 5 million (that's 5,000,000) of these lines into memory. I tried loading an array with arrays based on a split line like this, and I ran out of memory somewhere around 2,800,000. That is: $array[2_800_000][10]. Admittedly, my computer is not exactly top of the line anymore, but I suspect that there are easier ways to do what you plan. In short, that you are asking The Wrong Question. – TLP Nov 17 '11 at 23:11
    
Link to The Wrong Question. – TLP Nov 17 '11 at 23:23
    
I have done the following, except load it from a file. I have stored it into the array, although i split it into 5 files of 1 million lines due to the memory error. Thank you very much, i appreciate the help. I have just started doing perl recently and its far different from the languages im used to. – user1052629 Nov 28 '11 at 21:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem I believe you're having is the fact that Perl arrays can only be an array of a single piece of data. You can have each line in an array, but you don't want to store a single piece of data, you want to store 11 pieces of data.

Fortunately, Perl allows you to store references as a piece of data in your array. That reference can point to ...say... another array. Take a look at the Perl Reference Tutorial, and that should help you understand how this can be done.

This is really a fairly simple problem. First, let's make a loop that reads each line and puts each line into an array called @file_array.

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;  #So I dont have to worry about my file

open (my $fh, "<", "dataFile.txt");
my @file_array;
while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    push (@file_array, $line);
}

Now, let's make a program that takes each line, and splits it into an array:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;  #So I dont have to worry about my file

open (my $fh, "<", "dataFile.txt");
my @file_array;
while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    my @line_array = split (/\s+/, $line);
}

The two programs only differ in one line. The first splits the file into an array, and the second reads each line and splits it into an array.

Let's combine the two programs. And, instead of putting $line into each element of my @file_array, I'm going to be putting the *reference of @line_array into each element of my @file_array:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;  #So I dont have to worry about my file

open (my $fh, "<", "dataFile.txt");
my @file_array;
while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    my @line_array = split(/\s+/, $line);
    push (@file_array, \@line_array);
}

If I want to talk about the third line in my file, it's stored as a reference in $file_array[2]. I can dereference $file_array[2] by putting it in${}, and this would get me back my@line_array`:

my @line_array = ${$file_array[2]};

Now, if I want to talk about the fourth item on that line, I can say:

my $element = $line_array[3];

But, I can also combine the two operations onto a single line. Below, I am dereferencing the array stored in $file_array[2] and taking the fourth element (element #3) at the same time:

my $element = ${$file_array[2]}[3];

Not to clear? Fortunately, Perl has an -> operator which allows you to dereference the array without using the ${} syntax. This is way easier to read:

my $element = $file_array[2]->[3];

You'll see this a lot in modern Perl programs. This is how I talk about my array of arrays. In fact, Perl even allows you in arrays of arrays to completely remove the arrow operator between arrays. You can talk about this element this way:

my $element = $file_array[2][3];
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for taking the time to do this, that was extremely helpful. Your answer was very in depth and a great tutorial. – user1052629 Nov 28 '11 at 21:23

To learn, you must do. To do, you must occasionally try and fail so you can eat when the fish market is closed.

SO is about the questions and not the people asking the questions, so here is an answer, without any explanation to encourage you to look up what is happening.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use warnings; use strict;

my @data;

while (<DATA>) {
    next unless /\S/;
    push @data, [ split ];
}


__DATA__
230215 01/16/2000 57533 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217623

230215 01/18/2000 77659 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217624

230215 01/25/2000 76583 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217625

230215 01/29/2000 58082 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217626

230216 01/14/2000 50020 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217627

230216 01/18/2000 66444 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217628

230216 01/19/2000 51330 "" 0 1045403 "" ? 0 0 217629
share|improve this answer
    
+1 For complete answer although I think you shouldn't have posted it :) – FailedDev Nov 17 '11 at 20:54

Hints :

while(<FH>)
{
}#iterate line by line through the file pointed by FH

@result = split(m/\s+/, $subject); #store each column to array

So just create an array of references to arrays and you are done.

The rest I leave to you.

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