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I am currently developing a database storage solution for product inventory information for the company I work for. I am using MySql, and I am having a hard time coming up with an efficient, feasible format for the data storage.

As it works right now, we have ~25000 products to keep track of. For each product, there are about 20 different categories that we need to track information for(quantity available, price, etc..). This report is downloaded and updated every 3-4 days, and it is stored and updated in excel right now.

My problem is that the only solution I have come up with so far is to create separate tables for each one of the categories mentioned above, using foreign keys based off of the product skus, and cascading to update each respective table. However, this method would require that every table add 24000 rows each time the program is run, given that each product needs updated for the date it was run. The problem with this is that the data will be store for around a year, so the tables will grow an extensive amount. My research for other database formats has yielded some examples, but none on the scale of this. They are geared towards adding maybe 100 rows a day.

Does anybody know or have any ideas of a suitable way to set up this kind of database, or is the method I described above suitable and within the limitations of the MySql tables?

Thanks, Mike

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

25,000 rows is nothing to MySQL or a flat file for that case. Do not initially worry about data volume. I've worked on many retail database schemas and products are usually defined by either a static or arbitrary-length set of attributes. Your data quantity ends of not being that far off either way.

Static:

create table products (
    product_id integer primary key auto_increment
  , product_name varchar(255) -- or whatever
  , attribute1_id -- FK
  , attribute2_id -- FK
  , ...
  , attributeX_id -- FK
);

create table attributes (
    attribute_id integer primary key -- whatever
  , attribute_type -- Category?
  , attribute_value varchar(255)
);

Or, you obviously:

create table products (
    product_id integer primary key auto_increment
  , product_name varchar(255) -- or whatever
);

create table product_attributes (
    product_id integer
  , attribute_id integer
  , -- other stuff you want like date of assignment
  , primary key (product_id , attribute_id)
);

create table attributes (
    attribute_id integer primary key -- whatever
  , attribute_type -- Category?
  , attribute_value varchar(255)
);

I would not hesitate to shove a few hundred million records into a basic structure like either.

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Xepoch, Thank you for the response. That is very helpful and I will reference your advice as I proceed to develop this database. Being as I am new to mysql and database formatting, it is nice to have a veteran helping me out. –  SubxZero Nov 22 '11 at 21:40

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