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I have several binary tables that, taken together, model dictionary data. Each table consists of two columns, "id" for the entry identifier, and "data" to describe an entry property. There can be multiple similar properties per entry, so an entry with id "1" can have two spellings, five example phrases, etc, all keyed to the entry id. As some random example data:

table1:

id    data
1     "a"
1     "b"
1     "c"
2     "a"
2     "x"
...

table2:

id    data
1     "a"
2     "b"
...

table3:

id    data
1     "a"
1     "b"
2     "a"
2     "b"
2     "c"
2     "d"
...

I would like to query this data so that based on a search in table ... for entries with value "a", I get the full set of table values. Say for instance I want the data for all entries with table1 property "a", that'd give the list of ids {1,2}. The results I'd like would be

result:

id    t1prop    trprop    t3prop
1     a, b, c   a         a, b
2     a, x      b         a, b, c, d

Getting all relevant ids from one table is trivial,

SELECT DISTINCT id FROM table1 WHERE data LIKE "a"

But how do I use this result in a bigger select? If I try to join this with table2 on "id", I cannot seem to collapse table2.data into a single line like you can do using GROUP_CONCAT, so how can I make sure there's only one result for every distinct id, with multiple entries per table collapsed into (in this case comma) separated lists?

I tried to see if I could just join two or more tables, which works for two:

SELECT
  t1.id AS id,
  GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT t2.data SEPARATOR ', ') AS t2properties,
FROM
  (SELECT DISTINCT id FROM table1 WHERE data LIKE "a") AS t1
  JOIN table2 AS t2 ON t1.id=t2.id
GROUP BY t2.data

but does not work for more than two:

SELECT
  t1.id AS id,
  GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT t2.data SEPARATOR ', ') AS t2properties,
  GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT t3.data SEPARATOR ', ') AS t3properties
FROM
  (SELECT DISTINCT id FROM table1 WHERE data LIKE "a") AS t1
  JOIN table2 AS t2 ON t1.id=t2.id
  JOIN table3 AS t3 ON t1.id=t3.id
GROUP BY t2.data, t3.data

For more than two tables this won't collapse all table2.data and table3.data values for one id into single line. I also tried to do it as sequence of nested selects, but that just made the query take a very long time to run.

I have no idea what this kind of selecting is called, so I'm completely failing at googling for how this problem has been solved (probably a long time ago). If anyone knows how to do this, or what to search for to find out how to do this elsewhere, I would greatly appreciate any help.

update

The full nested select I tried, using my actual table names is as follows:

SELECT
  keb.id AS id,
  english,
  reading,
  GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT keb.data SEPARATOR ', ') AS kanji
FROM
  (SELECT
     eng.id AS id,
     english,
     GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT reb.data SEPARATOR ', ') AS reading
   FROM
     (SELECT
        DISTINCT id,
        GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT data SEPARATOR ', ') AS english
      FROM dictionary_eng
      WHERE (data LIKE "%tiger%")
      GROUP BY id
      ORDER BY id
     ) AS eng
     JOIN dictionary_reb AS reb ON eng.id=reb.id
   GROUP BY eng.id
   ORDER BY eng.id
  ) AS reb
  JOIN dictionary_keb AS keb ON reb.id=keb.id
  GROUP BY keb.id
  ORDER BY keb.id

the table definitions are all:

(id INT NOT NULL, data TEXT)

There are no INDEX columns, motivated mostly by the fact that this is JP->EN dictionary data. Indexing the English table basically makes it index entire paragraphs of text, which isn't ideal, and MySQL can't index the Japanese because of its minimum index length constraint (A minimum of 3 letters makes perfect sense for English, but most Japanese words only consist of one or two glyphs, so they're never indexed). I could set the id table up as an index, but since it's already INT that didn't seem to make much sense.

(There are also no primary keys because the ids are not unique identifiers in these tables)

MySQL explains my nested select as follows:

+----+-------------+----------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+---------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table          | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows   | Extra                           |
+----+-------------+----------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+---------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     | <derived2>     | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |     77 | Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | PRIMARY     | keb            | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 185054 | Using where; Using join buffer  |
|  2 | DERIVED     | <derived3>     | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |     77 | Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  2 | DERIVED     | reb            | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 178085 | Using where; Using join buffer  |
|  3 | DERIVED     | dictionary_eng | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 262929 | Using filesort                  |
+----+-------------+----------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+---------------------------------+

(table sizes are dictionary_eng: 268512 records, dictionary_keb: 182366 records, dictionary_reb: 172755 records)

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2 Answers

Try this:

SELECT
    T1.id,
    T1.properties AS t1properties,
    T2.properties AS t2properties,
    T3.properties AS t3properties
FROM
(
    SELECT id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT data SEPARATOR ', ') AS properties
    FROM table1
    GROUP BY id
) T1
JOIN
(
    SELECT id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT data SEPARATOR ', ') AS properties
    FROM table2
    GROUP BY id
) T2
ON T1.id = T2.id
JOIN
(
    SELECT id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT data SEPARATOR ', ') AS properties
    FROM table3
    GROUP BY id
) T3
ON T2.id = T3.id
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Sadly, that actually takes longer than the nested select to resolve. 17s for nested selection, 24s for sequential joins. –  Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 17 '11 at 23:06
    
@Mike'Pomax'Kamermans: What indexes do you have? Can you post EXPLAIN SELECT ... for the relevant queries? –  Mark Byers Nov 17 '11 at 23:13
    
I've updated the original post so that it contains that information now. –  Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 17 '11 at 23:29
    
I'm not sure that I fully understand why id shouldn't have an index. It doesn't need to be unique for an index to help. Could you try it? –  Mark Byers Nov 18 '11 at 7:30
    
I guess you're right, having an index on the id column does speed things up, although a two pass "find all ids" followed by "for each table select * where id in(list)" is still a lot faster. I suppose I'll keep it as separated queries, rather than keep trying to collapse it to a single one =/ –  Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 18 '11 at 18:32
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I'm not a mysql person but looking at this can you do the following:

1. Create three separate views using GROUP_CONCAT
    vTable01Props
    vTable02Props
    vTable03Props
2. Create a UNION view of the distinct ID's from Table1, Table2 & Table3
3. Write a query that LEFT JOINS these four views on ID

share|improve this answer
    
that would also be quite slow, however. –  Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 18 '11 at 2:04
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