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So I'm attempting to implement a hash table that will hash structures containing words.

the structures will be similar to this:

#ifndef HASHTABLE_H
#def HASHTABLE_H

typedef int (*HashFunctionT) (char* string, int upperbound);

struct node_
{
    char * word;
    struct node * next;
}
typedef struct node_ * node;

struct nodehash_
{
    int size;
    struct node * hash[100];
}
typedef struct nodehash_ * nodehash;

Hashtable createHashTable();
void addtohash(node list, nodehash hash);
#endif

And I want the hash function to work something like this:

#include "hashtable.h"

int hashFunction(char *word, int hashTableSize)
{
    int length = strlen(word);
    int h = 0;
    int i;  
    for(i = 0; i<length; i++)
    {
        h=31 *h  + word[i];
    }
    return h % hashTableSize;
};

nodehash createHashtable()
{
    nodehash hashtable;    
    hashtable = malloc(sizeof(struct nodehash_));

    hashtable->size = 100;
    hashtable->hash = malloc(100 * sizeof (node));
    int i;   
    for (i = 0; i < hashtable->size; i++)
    {
            hashtable->table[i] = NULL;
    }
    return hashtable;
};

void addtohash(node list, nodehash hashtable)
{
    int nodehashnumber;
    nodehashnumber = hashfunction(list->word, hash->size);
    hashtable->hash[nodehasnumber] = list;
};

And the main functio will look something like this (assume that the linked list of node structures has been created and filled).

int main()
{
    nodehash hashtable = createhashtable();
    node nodelist;
    /* here the nodelist would be created and filled and such and such*/
    while (nodelist->next != NULL)
    {
        addtohash(nodelist, hashtable);
    }
    return;
}

Assume that there can be no collisions, because every word to be hashed will be different.

BAsically, I'm wondering if I missed and glaring, obvious mistakes or flaws in logic.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Would this be better at codereview.stackexchange.com? –  David Heffernan Nov 17 '11 at 22:50
    
Oh I didn't even know that existed... thanks for letting me know! –  gfppaste Nov 17 '11 at 22:57
    
You cannot really assume there can be no collisions just because each word is different. Your hash function can produce the same output for multiple different inputs. –  TJD Nov 17 '11 at 23:48
    
Also, if you were to assume no collisions, then why are you using a node struct with a next pointer? You could just use an array of char* if not accounting for collisions –  TJD Nov 17 '11 at 23:50
    
So this is all part of a larger project implementing an LRU cache... basically, we are given a .txt file as input, and we need to tokenize the file, and search through the file using something better than O(n^2) time (so basically, linear search is out of the question, and we are encouraged to use a hashtable). The LRU cache is to contain the tokens, and will be dynamic: that is to say, the user specifies their own cache size. –  gfppaste Nov 18 '11 at 0:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I didn't give the code an extensive read, but the first thing that stood out pretty clearly is the hash table size, 100. It is best to use a prime number for the size of your hash tables to help avoid collisions.

share|improve this answer
    
That and the fact that it's a magic number that appears in several places. –  Fred Larson Nov 17 '11 at 22:57
    
+1 good interesting fact –  eversor Nov 17 '11 at 22:59
    
Definitely didn't know that, thanks for the info! –  gfppaste Nov 17 '11 at 23:01
    
@FredLarson: No wonder it stood out so quickly :) -- gfppaste, definitely replace the hardcoded 100 with a variable or #define, so you can more easily change the size of your tables in the future. –  sarnold Nov 17 '11 at 23:01
    
I don't think that prime numbers perform necessarily better in this case. Given enough spread (the K&R hash mentioned in not the best in town, but will do for reasonable length strings), the modulo 100 will not perform much worse than a modulo 101. –  wildplasser Nov 17 '11 at 23:42

You seem to have a problem with semicolons:

struct node_
{
    char * word;
    struct node * next;
}   /* <<-- HERE */
typedef struct node_ * node;

But::

int hashFunction(char *word, int hashTableSize)
{
    int length = strlen(word);
    int h = 0;
    int i;  
    for(i = 0; i<length; i++)
    {
        h=31 *h  + word[i];
    }
    return h % hashTableSize;
}; /* <<-- NOT here */

Also, a wise advice is IMHO to use as many unsigned types as possible: for the hash value (what does modulo division do with a negative operand?) and for sizes and indexes.

Rule of thumb: if it can not be negative: it's unsigned.

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