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If i have a list of objects and i want to move to the next node with each function call (ie create a "GetNextNode" how would i go about doing this? Right now i have one method which will get the first node of my List and set the currentObj to it and return it (leaving previous node still at null) a flag indicates that we're not dealing with the first node in the list anymore. then i move forward and i want to iterate through the list (using foreach i guess?) to one node past my currentObj. Here is my code:

 List<Employee> ListOfEmployees = new List<Employee>();
 Employee currEmployeeObj = null;
 Employee prevEmployeeObj = null;

 foreach (Employee employee in ListOfEmployees)
        {
           //how do i keep track of the previous and current employee in here?
        }

        return (currEmployeeObj); 
    }
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why do you do this casting in the first place? –  BrokenGlass Nov 17 '11 at 23:11
2  
Your entire if chain is useless, unless you've defined custom explicit casts (which would be very wrong) –  SLaks Nov 17 '11 at 23:12
    
well i think i "may" need the cast for something else before i'm done in this method - not sure yet, doesn't need to be regarded for the issue i'm having at the moment though.. –  BlueMonster Nov 17 '11 at 23:13
    
i'm casting because i may want to display information specific to each object later on in here... In any case, my question is how i would move one node ahead from where i left off... –  BlueMonster Nov 17 '11 at 23:14
    
possible duplicate of List<> Get Next element or get the first –  Koveras Apr 3 at 16:29
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4 Answers

Looks like you really are re-inventing an enumerator:

public IEnumerator<Employee> GetEmployees()
{
    foreach (Employee employee in ListOfEmployees)
    {
        //custom processing here
        yield return employee;
    }
}

Usage:

var myEnumerator = foo.GetEmployees();
while(myEnumerator.MoveNext())
{
    var someEmployee = myEnumerator.Current;
    //do something
}

Just as an update here is the full class implementation so you can verify it compiles and works..

public class Foo
{
    List<Employee> ListOfEmployees = new List<Employee>();

    public Foo()
    {
        ListOfEmployees.Add(new Employee());
    }

    public IEnumerator<Employee> GetEmployees()
    {
        foreach (Employee employee in ListOfEmployees)
            yield return employee;
    }
}
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sorry, what is "foo" in ur exmaple? –  BlueMonster Nov 17 '11 at 23:30
    
foo is the class that implements your GetEmployees() method that contains all your sample code –  BrokenGlass Nov 17 '11 at 23:36
    
@rich.okelly: foreach part did not compile - I restricted the example to explict enumerator block which works just fine for illustration and compiles and works. foreach would work if the class in question implemented IEnumerator<Employee> / GetEnumerator() –  BrokenGlass Nov 17 '11 at 23:39
    
@rich.okelly: Both your arguments are off the mark: an iterator block can return either IEnumerable or IEnumerator even though the former is much more often used (see i.e. csharpindepth.com/articles/Chapter11/StreamingAndIterators.aspx). Also he cannot use the enumerator of the list since he wants to do custom processing in between. –  BrokenGlass Nov 18 '11 at 2:52
    
@BrokenGlass: Can't he just return the list? –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 18 '11 at 2:57
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I hate to sound like a dinosaur, but since you're implementing with a List anyway, why not iterate over it with for instead of foreach? Integers are really useful for comparisons like i == j + 1

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+1 This'd work for me. –  Kirk Broadhurst Nov 18 '11 at 3:00
    
I wanted to iterate one node at a time - not one after the other all at once (if this is what u are meaning). Also, i wanted my code to be as abstract as possible. I think what u're getting at is what i initially had decided on, it's not very abstract. Thanks for the input –  BlueMonster Nov 19 '11 at 1:56
    
You certainly could do what you're describing - that is, setting currEmployee at the beginning of your loop and prevEmployee at the end of it, possibly in some sort of if so you can ignore employees who don't meet criteria. I don't see how this is more abstract, but it is assuredly harder to follow. –  sq33G Nov 19 '11 at 18:33
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(As an academic exercise, the other answers are probably more appropriate here: )

You could create an extension method like so:

public static IEnumerable<Tuple<T, T>> ToPairs<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        using (var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                var previous = enumerator.Current;
                while (enumerator.MoveNext())
                {
                    var current = enumerator.Current;
                    yield return new Tuple<T, T>(previous, current);
                    previous = current;
                }
            }
        }
    }

To return you a tuple containing pairs of elements.

Which would be used like:

foreach (var pair in ListOfEmployees.ToPairs())
{
   Employee prevEmployee = pair.Item1;
   Employee currEmployeeObj = pair.Item2;

}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.collections.ienumerator.aspx

The link above this line of text has what will work to solve my issue.

Thanks all for the responses and help! Upvoted those who tried to help and had something to offer

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