Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
  function help(n){

    document.write(n + '<br/>');
    if(n==10){ n=1;}
    n++;

    main(n);
 }

 function main(n){

  setTimeout('help(n)',500);

 }

I want it to print

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

and then again

1 2 3 4 5 6 etc

after 0.5 seconds

I want to do this by using the setTimeout method, but this approach doesn't work at all

My body element is like this

<body onload='main(1)'>

Can someone explain me why?

Edit: I changed the foo method to help. I made a mistake while editing my code in order to post this question.

share|improve this question
    
Where is your help method called from? –  talnicolas Nov 17 '11 at 23:14
    
It is good question-asking practice to be more descriptive instead of saying things "don't work at all" –  hugomg Nov 17 '11 at 23:19
1  
What browser do you use? (I'm getting "'n' is not defined" error in Chrome, FF and IE9) –  Ivan Nevostruev Nov 17 '11 at 23:20
    
well it doesn't display anything on my browser, not even an error saying what's wrong I'm using firefox –  jonathan Nov 17 '11 at 23:21
1  
of relevance: developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.setTimeout –  mg1075 Nov 17 '11 at 23:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe the reason you might get:

attempt to run compile-and-go script on a cleared scope

in Firebug is due to the use of document.write() after the page has loaded. This also appears to be a new Firebug JS error.

Once it runs initially, you are writing to the document after you are allowed to. I tried using document.open() and document.close(), and adding both did not fix the issue.

There are better ways, though. You can use this to replace the body content:

document.body.innerHTML = n + '<br/>;

Or this to add to it:

document.body.innerHTML += n + '<br/>;

Or, this (what I would recommend):

var div = document.createElement('div');
div.innerHTML = n + '<br/>';
document.body.appendChild(div);

Note, do not use setTimeout('help(n)',##), since that's eval()ing the code to call the function, which is bad practice. Also, avoid the second example above, since in some browsers you may experience performance issues due to the way that .innerHTML appends to a node. Hence, this is another bad practice to avoid.

Demonstration of the third method follows.

function help(n){
    var div = document.createElement('div');
    div.innerHTML = n + '<br/>';
    document.body.appendChild(div);

    if (n == 10) {
        n = 1;
    }

    n++;

    main(n);
}

function main(n){
    setTimeout(function(){
        help(n);
    }, 500);
}

main(5);

http://jsfiddle.net/be6He/1

share|improve this answer
1  
document.write in a queued function is a strange idea anyhow... Seems like writing into the contents of a specific DOM element is better (like your example). –  jball Nov 17 '11 at 23:41
function main(n){  
    setTimeout(help,500,n);
}

or for full IE compatibility :

 function main(n){  
    setTimeout(function(){
        help(n);
    },500);
}
share|improve this answer
    
According to w3schools.com/jsref/met_win_settimeout.asp the third argument to setTimeout is the script language. –  Ben Nov 17 '11 at 23:26
2  
And that's why we don't trust w3schools. The additional params are not IE compatible though... –  jball Nov 17 '11 at 23:38

Your setTimeout is calling a non-existent function, foo().

share|improve this answer
    
sorry that was an error it's meant to be help I just changed it before posting the question and forgot to edit –  jonathan Nov 17 '11 at 23:16

n is no longer in scope when the help function executes. Your main should do something like:

function main(n) {
    window.setTimeout(function() {
        help(n);
    }, 500);
}
share|improve this answer

setTimeout takes a function reference, not a string. Try something like:

function main(n)
{
  setTimeout(function () {
     help(n);
   }, 500);
}

EDIT:

setTimeout can take a string, but this function would not be run within the closure of main and n would be out of scope. Plus, it's highly recommended to use a function reference, like the example above.

share|improve this answer
    
It can take a string - it shouldn't (it's an unnecessary eval), but it can. –  jball Nov 17 '11 at 23:37
    
Ah interesting, never knew it took a string as well. So then in that case, yea n would be out of scope when it was called.. –  Mike Christensen Nov 18 '11 at 1:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.