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I am curious how to write a class for tuples of arbitrary number of components in java? These components are all of generic types. Is there a language feature, or any clever way, to do this?

Thanks!

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what is it that you want to do? how are you planning on using these tuples? and could you give an example of what kind of components these tuples could be made up of? –  davogotland Nov 17 '11 at 23:28
    
I am just thinking in general. For example, I may use these tuples as return values, or as hash keys or values, or as a logical group to organize data, etc. –  Qiang Li Nov 17 '11 at 23:31
    
but will you not have any conceptual limitation on what you may group together? i mean other than inheriting the class object. perhaps a common interface? –  davogotland Nov 17 '11 at 23:35
    
will you at least know what type an element will be of when you're fetching it from the tuple group? –  davogotland Nov 18 '11 at 0:27
    
Does the answer to your questions in any way facilitate or enable the creation of such a tuple class in a type-safe way with java generics? –  Qiang Li Nov 18 '11 at 0:43

4 Answers 4

If the components of the tuple are all of data type T, then you can simply use a List<T>.

If the components of the tuple all have different data types, then there's no simple way around this. In fact, Scala (which sits on top of the JVM) implements n-dimensional tuples by having a separate class (under the hood) for every value of n. For example, here is the code for a 2-dimensional tuple:

public class TwoTuple<T1, T2> {
    private T1 e1;
    private T2 e2;

    public TwoTuple(T1 e1, T2 e2) {
        this.e1 = e1;
        this.e2 = e2;
    }

    public T1 getE1() {
        return this.e1;
    }

    public T2 getE2() {
        return this.e2;
    }
}

You could similarly implement a 3-tuple, 4-tuple, etc.

Unfortunately, there is no generic way to implement this if you want to avoid casting. Of course, if you don't mind casting, you could simply use a List<Object>.

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"by having a separate class (under the hood) for every value of n." for arbitrary n? –  Qiang Li Nov 17 '11 at 23:25
    
"could similarly implement a 3-tuple, 4-tuple, etc.", did you mean leverage the TwoTuple you already created, or start anew and repeat what has been done for TwoTuple? –  Qiang Li Nov 17 '11 at 23:26
    
It actually only supports tuples of up to 21 or 22 dimensions if I recall correctly. The language supports tuples so that you can have return types of multiple objects. The designers figured that if you're returning 23-dimensional tuples where each generic type is pre-specified, you're doing something wrong. :P –  Mansoor Siddiqui Nov 17 '11 at 23:26
    
I meant that you would have to repeat the logic I wrote for TwoTuple in a separate class. It would probably make sense for all tuples to extend a Tuple class or implement a common interface -- but ultimately, they'd have to be separate classes. –  Mansoor Siddiqui Nov 17 '11 at 23:28

this is as type safe as i could get it. my proposed solution to this depends on knowing the type of the object at the time of "get":ting or "set":ting it. if that type is wrong, a meaningful run time exception is thrown, explaining what you did wrong.

this solution is not type safe during compilation. it produces no compiler errors if you make mistakes. but it is type safe during runtime in the sense that it doesn't allow mistakes with the types. you declare the types of the tuple members in the constructor, and these types are reinforced for the complete life time of the object.

the tuple class:

/**
 * A utility class for run time type safe mixed collections.
 * 
 * @author davogotland
 */
public class Tuple {
    private Class<?>[]      m_types;
    private Object[]        m_objects;

    /**
     * Constructor, initializes members.
     * 
     * @param objects
     *          An array of class objects, representing the
     *          objects of this tuple, followed by the
     *          objects of this tuple. The order these
     *          objects are passed to the constructor will
     *          decide what index they will be referred to
     *          with as they are being fetched or updated.
     */
    public Tuple(Object... objects) {
        if(objects.length == 0) {
            m_types = new Class<?>[] {};
            m_objects = new Object[] {};
        } else {
            try {
                m_types = (Class<?>[])objects[0];
            } catch(ClassCastException cce) {
                throw new RuntimeException("the first parameter of Tuplet constructor must be an array of class objects.");
            }

            m_objects = new Object[m_types.length];

            if(objects.length != 1) {
                if(m_types.length != (objects.length - 1)) {
                    throw new RuntimeException("the first parameter of Tuplet constructor must be an array with the same length as the number of following arguments.");
                }

                System.arraycopy(objects, 1, m_objects, 0, m_types.length);

                for(int i = 0; i < m_types.length; i++) {
                    try {
                        m_types[i].cast(m_objects[i]);
                    } catch(ClassCastException cce) {
                        throw new RuntimeException("the class objects of the first parameter to Tuple constructor must match the types of the following parameters. error at parameter " + i + ", type of " + m_objects[i] + " declared as " + m_types[i].getName() + " but was " + m_objects[i].getClass().getName() + ".");
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Gets an element from the tuple.
     * 
     * @param <T>
     *          The type of the element to fetch.
     * @param c
     *          A class object representing the
     *          elements type.
     * @param i
     *          The index of the element to fetch. This
     *          index is decided by the order the elements
     *          are added during construction of the
     *          tuple.
     * @return
     *          The element at the given index, cast to
     *          the given type.
     */
    public <T> T get(Class<T> c, int i) {
        if(c != m_types[i]) {
            throw new RuntimeException("the get method for index " + i + " must return a " + m_types[i].getName() + ". (attempted was " + c.getName() + ")");
        }

        return c.cast(m_objects[i]);
    }

    /**
     * Sets an element in the tuple.
     * 
     * @param i
     *          The index where the object should be set.
     * @param object
     *          The object to set.
     */
    public void set(int i, Object object) {
        if(m_types[i] != object.getClass()) {
            throw new RuntimeException("the set method for index " + i + " must take a " + m_types[i].getName() + ". (attempted was " + object.getClass().getName() + ")");
        }

        m_objects[i] = object;
    }
}

a test class (for good meassure):

/**
 * A representation of a fraction.
 * 
 * @author davogotland
 */
public class Fraction {
    private int     m_numerator;
    private int     m_denominator;

    /**
     * Constructor, initializes members.
     * 
     * @param numerator
     * @param denominator
     */
    public Fraction(int numerator, int denominator) {
        m_numerator = numerator;
        m_denominator = denominator;
    }

    /**
     * Calculates the value of this fraction as a double.
     * 
     * @return
     *          The value of this fraction as a double.
     */
    public double getDoubleValue() {
        return (double)m_numerator / (double)m_denominator;
    }

    /* (non-Javadoc)
     * @see java.lang.Object#toString()
     */
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder       builder = new StringBuilder();

        builder.append(m_numerator);
        builder.append("/");
        builder.append(m_denominator);

        return builder.toString();
    }
}

and intended usage:

/**
 * Proving that the class Tuple works.
 * 
 * @author davogotland
 */
public class Main {
    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Tuple       t = new Tuple(new Class<?>[] {Float.class, Fraction.class, Integer.class}, 2.2f, new Fraction(1, 3), 4);

        System.out.println("first: " + t.get(Float.class, 0));
        //expected output: first: 2.2
        System.out.println("second: " + t.get(Fraction.class, 1));
        //expected output: second: 1/3
        System.out.println("third: " + t.get(Integer.class, 2));
        //expected output: third: 4

        t.set(0, 3.5f);

        double      sum = t.get(Float.class, 0);

        sum += t.get(Fraction.class, 1).getDoubleValue();
        sum += t.get(Integer.class, 2);

        System.out.println("sum: " + sum);
        //expected output: sum: 7.833333333333334

        t = new Tuple(new Object[] {new Class<?>[] {Float.class, Fraction.class, Integer.class}});
        t.set(0, 3.5f);

        System.out.println("first: " + t.get(Float.class, 0));
        //expected output: first: 3.5

        System.out.println("second: " + t.get(Fraction.class, 1));
        //expected output: second: null
        System.out.println("third: " + t.get(Integer.class, 2));
        //expected output: third: null


        sum = t.get(Float.class, 0);

        sum += t.get(Fraction.class, 1).getDoubleValue();
        //expected null pointer exception on the above line
        sum += t.get(Integer.class, 2);

        System.out.println("sum: " + sum);
    }
}
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tuple - In mathematics and computer science, a tuple is an ordered list of elements (wikipedia)

So I would use a List<T>

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But what if I want to leverage Java generics functionalities to make the tuple components of different types? –  Qiang Li Nov 17 '11 at 23:24
1  
A class is perfect for that. –  emory Nov 17 '11 at 23:43

The simple ways to model a tuple with arbitrary numbers of components are:

  • SomeType[] if a tuple's size doesn't change
  • List<SomeType> if a tuple's size must be able to change,
  • Object[] or List<Object> if the tuples need to be able to hold values of arbitrary (reference) type (with runtime type safety via casts), or
  • Tuple2<T1, T2>, Triple3<T1, T2, T3>, etc ... i.e. a different generic class for each value of N.

There is no generic way in Java to model statically type-safe general N-tuples using a single class.

(I take it that you really do want static type-safety; i.e. you want the getters and setters for each position in the tuple to have the appropriate static return types so that you don't need a typecast. Unfortunately, that's the part that is hard.)

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