Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a form for updating user data. It posts to this page:

<?php
    //Update user table
    session_start();
    include 'sql_connect_R.inc.php';

    $id = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['userID']);
    $password = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['user_passwrd']);

    $salt = time();
    $hash = sha1($password . $salt);

    mysql_query("UPDATE users SET user_passwrd = '$hash', stamp = '$salt', pending = 'yes'
    WHERE userID = '$id'");

    mysql_close($con);
?>

(I have edited out the things not pertinent to this question)

I believe what is happening is when the 'stamp' field is being populated with the $salt it is getting a different value than when the $hash is being calculated. Therefore, when a user signs in and is checked here:

$qry="SELECT * FROM users WHERE userlogin = '$login' AND user_passwrd = sha1(CONCAT('$password', stamp))";
    $result=mysql_query($qry);
    $row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result);
    $num = mysql_num_rows($result);

When I echo $num it returns a value of 0. I'm wondering if there is a way to ensure that the value of $salt remains the same when it is being used in $hash and then when it is updating the field 'stamp'. Can anyone help me with this or point me in the right direction? Thanks in advance. Cheers

share|improve this question
    
Check whether PHP inserted the wrong hash or MYSQL is looking for the wrong hash. That will split the problem space in half. –  David Schwartz Nov 18 '11 at 0:07
    
The wrong hash is being inserted. I think there is a difference between the value of $salt when the password is being hashed and the value of $salt when it is being inserted in the database, but I'm not really sure. –  Spud Nov 18 '11 at 0:13
    
What is the column definition for user_passwrd? –  Ben Nov 18 '11 at 0:14
    
I had a problem when my password field in the db was too short - it was cutting off part of the encrypted string when inserting, due to field length. But the query was checking for the match of the full encrypted password string. –  AR. Nov 18 '11 at 0:17
    
What is $password in the second code? –  Vincent Savard Nov 18 '11 at 3:12

3 Answers 3

More ideas so I've changed my comment into an answer...

It's worth noting that you're using PHP's SHA1 function when storing but mysql's when retrieving. They should be the same but that's the first place I'd look to debug this. try using mysql's sha function to store the hash or retrieve the record based on login, read the salt and hash it in PHP to compare

How are you storing the timestamp? Is it possible that it's being transformed/rounded/clipped/treated as a date string in some way? Just for a sanity check, take the string you're feeding into the sha1 function in both steps and check they're identical.

Further to your comment, can you post the schema for the relevant fields in the table?

share|improve this answer
    
user_passwrd varchar(60) No / stamp int(50) No ... Is it possible the value of $salt is different between the time the password is hashed and the time it is inserted into the 'stamp' field? –  Spud Nov 18 '11 at 0:24
    
It shouldn't be - if you were calling time() directly (twice) then yes but you're storing it in a variable after that it's just a number. Try outputting $salt after the mysql INSERT, then compare it with the value stored in the Db –  Basic Nov 18 '11 at 0:28
    
I checked and it's the same before and after update function. Now I'm really stumped. –  Spud Nov 18 '11 at 0:42
    
Try doing SHA1("Test") in both PHP and MySQL - do you get the same result? –  Basic Nov 18 '11 at 1:44
    
Thank you for all comments. I want to report that I've 'solved' the problem. I had made a change in the name of the password input field late one night and neglected to change the $_POST value. What this did, of course, was not supply the $password value to the $hash. Though I'm embarrassed about this, I think it is important for me to share my oversight to exemplify how important it is to check ALL places where errors can occur. I failed to double-check everything and made incorrect assumptions about the nature of the problem. Cheers –  Spud Nov 18 '11 at 20:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you for all comments. I want to report that I've 'solved' the problem. I had made a change in the name of the password input field late one night and neglected to change the $_POST value. What this did, of course, was not supply the $password value to the $hash. Though I'm embarrassed about this, I think it is important for me to share my oversight to exemplify how important it is to check ALL places where errors can occur. I failed to double-check everything and made incorrect assumptions about the nature of the problem. The code worked fine, it was the loose screw in front of the keyboard that caused the problems. Cheers

share|improve this answer

You're doing your queries incorrectly. You need to concatenate the variables in the string and NOT use single quotes. Use the quote to the left of your 1 key ``. This is the way that most MySQL read queries. example:

<?php
      //Update user table      
session_start();      
include 'sql_connect_R.inc.php';        
$id = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['userID']);      
$password = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['user_passwrd']);        
$salt = time();      
$hash = sha1($password . $salt);        
mysql_query("UPDATE `users` SET `user_passwrd` = '".$hash."', `stamp` = '".$salt."', `pending` = 'yes' WHERE `userID` = '".$id."'");        
mysql_close($con);  
?> 

$qry="SELECT * FROM `users` WHERE `userlogin` = '".$login."' AND `user_passwrd` = '".sha1(CONCAT($password, stamp))".'";        
$result=mysql_query($qry);        
$row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result);        
$num = mysql_num_rows($result); 

This little change should help. Sometimes the db can be a little touchy. I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not true. The backticks are absolutely not necessary (heck, I even advise against using them), and you don't have to concatenate when you use double quotes. –  Vincent Savard Nov 18 '11 at 2:45
    
In the past, doing this has helped me. I'm not totally sure why but, when I changed it to backticks and concatenated the variables, everything worked. So, I've been doing it this way for a while. Who says that this wouldn't help him? I don't see you answerring the question. I was just trying to help. –  jpferrierjr Nov 18 '11 at 3:00
1  
Of course you were, but you have to know what you are doing. I am not trying to bash you or anything. The purpose of backticks is basically to "escape" column, table or database names. This allows you to use special characters such as spaces in your structure names, or to use reserved keywords. Explicit concatenation will do nothing in this case, as it is doing the exact same thing as OP's code. The query in itself works, the problem is the incorrect data. (1) –  Vincent Savard Nov 18 '11 at 3:03
    
If I'm not giving an answer, it's most likely because those problems are out of my control. I cannot test OP's code nor can I test his data. I'm entirely dependant of him doing whatever tasks I may ask him, and this is not what I like to do. (2) –  Vincent Savard Nov 18 '11 at 3:04
    
Thank you for all comments. I want to report that I've 'solved' the problem. I had made a change in the name of the password input field late one night and neglected to change the $_POST value. What this did, of course, was not supply the $password value to the $hash. Though I'm embarrassed about this, I think it is important for me to share my oversight to exemplify how important it is to check ALL places where errors can occur. I failed to double-check everything and made incorrect assumptions about the nature of the problem. Cheers. –  Spud Nov 18 '11 at 20:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.