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Setup

I have a graph library where I am trying to decompose things as much as possible, and the cleanest way to describe it that I found is the following: there is a vanilla type node implementing only a list of edges:

class node
{
   public:
      int* edges;
      int edge_count;
};

Then, I would like to be able to add interfaces to this whole mix, like so:

template <class T>
class node_weight
{
   public:
      T weight;
};

template <class T>
class node_position
{
   public:
      T x;
      T y;
};

and so on. Then, the actual graph class comes in, which is templated on the actual type of node:

template <class node_T>
class graph
{
   protected:
      node_T* nodes;

   public:
      static graph cartesian(int n, int m)
      {
         graph r; 

         r.nodes = new node_T[n * m];

         return r;
      }
};

The twist is that it has named constructors which construct some special graphs, like a Cartesian lattice. In this case, I would like to be able to add some extra information into the graph, depending on what interfaces are implemented by node_T.

What would be the best way to accomplish this?

Possible solution

I thought of the following humble solution, through dynamic_cast<>:

template <class node_T, class weight_T, class position_T>
class graph
{
   protected:
      node_T* nodes;

   public:
      static graph cartesian(int n, int m)
      {
         graph r;

         r.nodes = new node_T[n * m];

         if (dynamic_cast<node_weight<weight_T>>(r.nodes[0]) != nullptr)
         {
            // do stuff knowing you can add weights
         }

         if (dynamic_cast<node_position<positionT>>(r.nodes[0]) != nullptr)
         {
            // do stuff knowing you can set position
         }

         return r;
      }
};

which would operate on node_T being the following:

template <class weight_T, class position_T>
class node_weight_position : 
      public node, public node_weight<weight_T>, public node_position<position_T>
{
    // ...
};

Questions

Is this -- philosophically -- the right way to go? I know people don't look nicely at multiple inheritance, though with "interfaces" like these it should all be fine.

There are unfortunately problems with this. From what I know at least, dynamic_cast<> involves quite a bit of run-time overhead. Hence, I run into a problem with what I had solved earlier: writing graph algorithms that require weights independently of whether the actual node_T class has weights or not. The solution with this 'interface' approach would be to write a function:

template <class node_T, class weight_T>
inline weight_T get_weight(node_T const & n)
{
   if (dynamic_cast<node_weight<weight_T>>(n) != nullptr)
   {
      return dynamic_cast<node_weight<weight_T>>(n).weight;
   }

   return T(1);
}

but the issue with it is that it works using run-time information (dynamic_cast), yet in principle I would like to decide it at compile-time and thus make the code more efficient.

If there is a different solution that would solve both problems, especially a cleaner and better one than what I have, I would love to hear about it!

share|improve this question
    
Oh dear. Construction functions that return by value? Raw pointers? Classes with pointer members and no copy constructors? I think you should probably start with something simpler and build it up gradually... –  Kerrek SB Nov 18 '11 at 1:25
    
Please comment the problem at hand, not the choices in presentation :). I wrote it so that it is understandable; in reality there is a std::vector<> instead of a pointer, things aren't public, etc. –  fledgling Cxx user Nov 18 '11 at 1:31
    
Regarding CRTP: doesn't help, dynamic_cast is used to check if a particular interface was actually implemented. The problem is that the type node_T is known to the compiler at compile-time, hence there should be a way to used that knowledge and vary behavior of functions depending on the actual type. –  fledgling Cxx user Nov 18 '11 at 1:38
    
@fledgeling: There are just several disconnected little things that at least raise an eyebrow, so it's hard to say concisely what you should do other than "design it more carefully". Maybe if you break it down into smaller bits, they can be answered concisely one by one. Anyway, you seem to have gotten what you're after, so best of luck with it! –  Kerrek SB Nov 18 '11 at 2:18
    
Yes, it seems that type_traits is the way to go.. at least BGL uses that, so it seems that defining my own traits and defining them for standard types will be the best way to go. –  fledgling Cxx user Nov 18 '11 at 2:30
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What about type traits? If you have a compiler handy that supports parts of C++11 already, there is std::is_base_of in the <type_traits> header.

If you do not, there is boost with the same type trait.

Now, to really be able to use it, you need some meta programming:

// in the class...
//  branch on whether the node type has weights
static void set_weights(node_T* nodes, std::true_type){
    // has weights, set them
    // ...
}

static void set_weight(node_T* nodes, std::false_type){
    // doesn't have weights, do nothing
}

// in the function...
typedef std::is_base_of<node_weight<weight_T>, node_T>::type has_weights;
set_weight(nodes, has_weights());

This works thanks to some magic that lets the nested typedef type be either true_type or false_type based on whether the type trait is true or false. We need the meta programming (branching through overloads), because accessing members that aren't there will result in a compiler error, even if the access was in a branch that would never be executed.

I hope that makes any sense at all, it's quite difficult to type an answer to this topic on an iPod Touch...

share|improve this answer
    
Type traits it is, seems like the cleanest approach. –  fledgling Cxx user Nov 18 '11 at 2:31
    
Great answer! Will vote up after 20 hours when my votes are refilled. –  Viet Jul 27 '12 at 6:54
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First of all I am a big fan of multiple inheritance when used at the right time. So if it makes your design simpler then use it. As for getting rid of dynamic_cast<> and replacing it with a compile time selection that is easy. You just use overloaded functions to do the switching for you. You have one function which takes void* when you can't do anything useful with the type and a function that does something useful with the specified type. Your code would look like the following.

template <class node_T, class weight_T, class position_T>
class graph
{
protected:
    node_T* nodes;

private:
    static void do_stuff_with_weights(graph& r, void* /*dummy*/)
    {
    }

    static void do_stuff_with_weights(graph& r, node_weight<weight_T>* /*dummy*/)
    {
        // do stuff knowing you can add weights
    }

    static void do_stuff_with_pos(graph& r, void* /*dummy*/)
    {
    }

    static void do_stuff_with_pos(graph& r, node_position<position_T>* /*dummy*/)
    {
            // do stuff knowing you can set position
    }

public:
    static graph cartesian(int n, int m)
    {
        graph r;

        r.nodes = new node_T[n * m];

        do_stuff_with_weights(r, (node_T*) 0);
        do_stuff_with_pos(r, (node_T*) 0);

        return r;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Much simpler than my version and without using type traits... +1 –  Xeo Nov 18 '11 at 1:42
    
That reminds me, why the hassle with a dummy parameter? Just pass the nodes themselves, since it's a simple upcast from derived to base. –  Xeo Nov 18 '11 at 1:51
    
Thanks @Xeo. In case it is isn't clear fledgling-cxx-user, both Xeo's and my answer use the same technique which is that overloaded functions can be used kind of like a switch/if statement where the selection is done based on the type of the argument rather than an integer index/condition. It is a pretty handy technique that comes up regularly in generic programming for implementing conditional behaviour. –  Bowie Owens Nov 18 '11 at 1:52
    
@Xeo, it is kind of a habit. I tend to pass a dummy value to indicate that the argument is used for selecting the right function and is not a proper argument to the function. But yes r.nodes[0] would have been quite reasonable. –  Bowie Owens Nov 18 '11 at 1:55
    
@fledgling Cxx user: An explanation on the technique wo both used here can be found in this wonderful lecture by Stephen T Lavavej from Channel9. –  Xeo Nov 18 '11 at 2:20
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