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Does these two snippets accomplish the same thing? Assuming I have three IBOutlet UIButtons in my interface file called buttonOne, buttonTwo, and buttonThree:

- (void)dealloc {
    for(UIButton* idx in self.view.subviews)
        [idx release], idx = nil;

    [super dealloc];
}

and

- (void)dealloc {
    [buttonOne release], buttonOne = nil;
    [buttonTwo release], buttonTwo = nil;
    [buttonThree release], buttonThree = nil;
    [super dealloc];
}

Edit:

As ARC sometimes seems like a fix-all alternative to memory management in iOS, I prefer not to use it because a) I feel like I'm cheating and b) if I am not mistaken, it only works on iOS 5 devices.

share|improve this question
    
Re: Edit B, You are mistaken. Full ARC works on iOS 4.3, and you get most ARC functionality on iOS 4.2 with the exception of weak, you use unsafe_unretained instead. – NJones Nov 18 '11 at 1:58
    
Oh goodness, I was very VERY mistaken! ARC sounds pretty dreamy- I'm gonna check it out. Thanks for the recommendation! – iamataptool Nov 18 '11 at 2:08
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming you don't have any other subviews, those two pieces of code do the same thing. But it's not a thing you should do.

You should declare your outlets weak (if using ARC) or assign (if not using ARC). Then you don't have to release them in dealloc. A UIView retains its subviews and releases them when it is deallocated, so you don't need to retain or release them. You just release self.view (or, if you're a subclass of UIViewController, you let [super dealloc] take care of releasing self.view).

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This is incorrect, you should use Strong (if using ARC) and retain if not using ARC. Otherwise if your view gets unloaded during low memory conditions, all your outlets are gone by that time, and you might want to do something with them before releasing them too. – Oscar Gomez Jan 9 '12 at 16:35
    
From Apple's Resource Programming Guide: "Outlets should generally be weak, except for those from File’s Owner to top-level objects in a nib file (or, in iOS, a storyboard scene) which should be strong." You can "do something with them" in didReceiveMemoryWarning. – rob mayoff Jan 9 '12 at 18:49
    
You are correct, I have not used ARC, but assumed since before ARC IBOutlets where declared as retain, that they would be strong in ARC, however I see they are weak to avoid strong reference cycles. Still if you are not using ARC you should be using retain not assign. If you can edit your answer, I will upvote it, sorry this was my mistake. – Oscar Gomez Jan 9 '12 at 20:38

No they dont, the first one will go through ALL views in the views subviews, all the foreach does is cast it to a UIButton, but you are iterating through the whole content of the views subviews array.. you should do

- (void)dealloc {
    for(UIButton* idx in self.view.subviews)
   {
        if([idx isKindOfClass:UIButton])
        { [idx release] } 
    }
    [super dealloc];
}
share|improve this answer

Yes and no If you have any other views as subviews then those as well will be released in the first method but not the second. Otherwise if only buttons are subviews then yes these two things will have the same result.

I suggest looking into ARC so you do not have to worry about any of this memory management business.

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