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I was wondering if it would be possible to save different versions of a particular file in Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate. Let's say that I want to change a major part of my project. I know that the current version of my project is running fine, but I want to make some change and then compare the two versions of the program. I want to be able to save multiple versions of a C++ source/header file and then use the desired version according to my needs. Is this possible?

Thanks,

Devjeet

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Make a copy of the file you want to change and name it something different. Then create two build profiles, one which compiles one version, and another which compiles the other. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 18 '11 at 1:24
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There are things like version control programs which can do this for the whole project. See for example git, cvs, or some other tool like that... –  tp1 Nov 18 '11 at 1:26
    
Oh,yeah, that's what I do right now. I was wondering if there was a more streamlined approach to it as compared to renaming or backup/restore, like if there was an inbuilt feature –  devjeetroy Nov 18 '11 at 1:26
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@devjeetroy Visual Studio has tools built-in for working with revision control. Out of the box, it has hooks for TFS, but you can also use the built-in tooling with other systems (ie: I use it with Mercurial...) –  Reed Copsey Nov 18 '11 at 1:30
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I think the tool for this is called a DVCS, with emphasis on the D for this case ;-) –  user166390 Nov 18 '11 at 1:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I want to be able to save multiple versions of a C++ source/header file and then use the desired version according to my needs. Is this possible?

This is really a job for version control. I would recommend looking into a revision control system.

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There is a property for source files to exclude a source from a particular build. With that you for instance exclude a source from release-build and include it for debug-build. You can extend that for extra (user-defined) build-types.

example: create an extra build-type (with configuration manager) with both a release and debug build for it, where you exclude the original source(s). then create the different source you want to change and include those in the project and make sure that those are exluded from the original builds. You need to use different names for those changed sources (preserving the originals).

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