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C#.net 2008

I'm working on a class file with a few hundred properties across about 8 serialized categories. At the moment it will look like this:

[CategoryAttribute("Group1")]
public string property
[CategoryAttribute("Group1")]
public string property
[CategoryAttribute("Group1")]
public string property
[CategoryAttribute("Group1")]
public string property

[CategoryAttribute("Group2")]
public string property
[CategoryAttribute("Group2")]
public string property
[CategoryAttribute("Group2")]
public string property
[CategoryAttribute("Group2")]
public string property

I've done research in past times and haven't found any leads to a solution so this time I'm asking if anyone has a solution to get something less messy? Such as:

[CategoryAttribute("Group1")]
{
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
}
[CategoryAttribute("Group2")]
{
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
public string property;
}
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+25

While all the other answers are completely correct, i could propose you another idea.

You could try to use T4 templates to generate such file. Please see my example at GitHub

Basically I created a template /EntitiesWithALotOfProperties/FirstClass.generated.tt, which reads a file with same name, but with replaced ".generated.tt" to ".template.cs" and processes the latter according to your logic.

What is important to note: the FirstClass.template.cs should have set the build action to 'None'. The idea was: *.cs files can be easily edited with ReSharper (basically have IntelliSense), but at the same time, it doesn't declare duplicate members.

Here are some screenshots: Another partial part Template file Generated file

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This is a very interesting concept I have not yet ever seen before! I'll keep the question open for now just in case there is another magical way someone can think of! Thanks for your post. –  Craig White Dec 8 '11 at 11:37
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No. Attributes aren't made to attach to groups of items like that. If you really have hundreds of properties in each class, you might want to think about reorganizing your classes. Can each group be a class? Are these complex business objects, or could the categories become dictionary objects with the properties contained within them? Just some ideas.

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You might consider writing a custom type-descriptor which exposes a ICustomAttributeProvider for it's various members. Although this isn't that hard to implement, I found the type-descriptor discovery in .NET slightly broken. Most framework functions recognize them, but others don't and just use GetType().GetProperty() instead (WCF DataServiceContext for example).

I suggest you stick with your current approach, but I would make the category name a const somewhere (Attribute-values have to be constants), so you can change it in one place. If you need help implementing the type-descriptor let me know and I'm sure I can come up with an example. Have a look at the TypeDescriptor, TypeDescriptorProvider and PropertyDescriptor classes in MSDN, you must be really careful especially with such a huge class (and usually you have more than just the CategoryAttribute on properties, which requires you to mix the built-in type-descriptor and your custom one).

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