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I had a weird problem about GZip and I hope you can help me.

using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream(10240))
{
   //isCompressed will be true if the browser accepts gzip
   using (Stream writer = isCompressed ?
                    (Stream)(new GZipStream(memoryStream, CompressionMode.Compress)) :
                    memoryStream)
   {
      StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

      //filenames is collection of multi js files need to be minify
      foreach (string fileName in fileNames)
      {
         sb.Append(File.ReadAllText(context.Server.MapPath(fileName)));
      }

      //minifier is an instance of Microsoft.Ajax.Utilities.Minifier
      string minifiedString = minifier.MinifyJavaScript(sb.ToString());

      byte[] bts = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(minifiedString);
      writer.Write(bts, 0, bts.Length);
   }
}

The length of bts is actually over 6000, however, when writer.Write(bts, 0, bts.length) has been executed, writer can only write 2334 characters, I checked the inside info, it says, operation is not support, I was so confused, and I don't know why?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand the scenario, Vinay is correct that the 6k is being compressed. However, why use custom code to gzip your content? Why not just turn on static and dynamic compression in IIS and let IIS do the work? Furthermore, use a library like http://RequestReduce.com that will automatically combine and minify your css and js on the fly with no code and possibly no config as well as sprite your images.

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1  
Turning on static and dynamic compression in IIS is not always an option. For example if he is on shared hosting, some hosting companies disable it on the shared plans. For this reduce i still use my custom libary for compression/minification. –  Ashok Padmanabhan Nov 19 '11 at 5:04
    
Good point. Do you know of any popular hosting providers who disallow IIS compression? –  Matt Wrock Nov 19 '11 at 10:54
    
If a hosting provider doesn't allow you to turn on gzip, change hosting providers is my view... –  Andy Davies Nov 28 '11 at 17:02

But why are you confused? Isn't compressing scripts is the idea here - so gzip stream would take few bytes and will compressed them - hence the resultant data will be of small size than input data. So your 6000 bytes are getting compressed into 2334 bytes.

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