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I want to remove all null properties in a generic object. It doesn't have to be recursive, one level deep is also fine.

The reason I need is for a custom JavascriptConvertor implementation for JSON serialization which gives me: {"Name":"Aleem", "Age":null, "Type":"Employee"}

And I would like to skip over the null object.

The function for this task takes in the objct and returns a Dictionary:

IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)

So I would like to remove all null properties from obj. All properties have getter but if the property is not set, the getter returns null.

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1  
How would you remove a member? The question is a bit unclear... – Ward Werbrouck May 3 '09 at 19:38
    
IIRC, "members" are also properties and methods. So I don't know how you'd "remove" them either. – Colin Burnett May 3 '09 at 19:41
2  
And if they are null, there's not much left to remove is there? – Peter Lillevold May 3 '09 at 19:49
    
new { Foo = "lol", Bar = null } to new { Foo = "lol" }? Don't think that's possible unless you create your own type in memory. anonymous (generic?) types are illusions of the compiler, which creates the types at compile time... – Will May 3 '09 at 19:53
    
Well, a method cannot be null. A property, in and of itself, has no value (in the sense of a field) so you have to call a get accessor to get the value. What if a property doesn't have a get accessor? aleemb absolutely needs to explain more for his question to make sense. – Colin Burnett May 3 '09 at 19:56
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can implement your own JavaScriptConverter to handle serialization of your type. Then you get full control on how properties are serialized.

@Richards answer provides a nice implementation of the Serialize method.

The Deserialize method would be quite similar but I'll leave the implementation up to you. Now the only drawback with JavaScriptConverter is that it has to get the supported types from somewhere. Either hardcode it like this:

public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
{ 
    get
    {
        var list = new List<Type>{ typeof(Foo), typeof(Bar)...};
        return list.AsReadOnly();
    }
}

...or make it configurable, e.g. via the class constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Peter, this is for a custom JavascriptConvertor – aleemb May 3 '09 at 20:52
    
Exactly. If the standard converter includes properties that are null you could create your own converter that ignores these properties and register it with the serializer. – Peter Lillevold May 3 '09 at 22:38
    
He's right though, but you need to cast the object to your type Serialize(object obj,... MyObject o = (MyObject)obj; then check if property is not null add to dictionary for serialization ... – Chad Grant May 3 '09 at 22:40
    
The object can be of any type: Foo, Bar, etc. And it can have any number of properties... I'd like to have a generic solution than handle each object type individually. – aleemb May 4 '09 at 8:00
    
*than = rather than – aleemb May 4 '09 at 8:00

Something along the lines of the following will probably do the trick:

public IDictionary<string, object> GetNonNullProertyValues(object obj)
{
    var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    foreach (var property in obj.GetType().GetProperties())
    {
        var propertyValue = property.GetValue(obj, null);
        if (propertyValue != null)
        {
            dictionary.Add(property.Name, propertyValue);
        }
    }

    return dictionary;
}

NB: this method does not handle indexed properties.

share|improve this answer
 using System.IO;
 using System.Runtime.Serialization.Json;

    public static class JsonExtensions
    {
        public static string ToJson<T>(this T instance) 
        {
            var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(T));
            using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
            {
                serializer.WriteObject(memoryStream, instance);

                memoryStream.Flush();
                memoryStream.Position = 0;

                using (var reader = new StreamReader(memoryStream))
                {
                    return reader.ReadToEnd();
                }
            }
        }

        public static T FromJson<T>(this string serialized) 
        {
            var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(T));
            using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
            {
                using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(memoryStream))
                {
                    writer.Write(serialized);
                    writer.Flush();

                    memoryStream.Position = 0;

                    return (T)serializer.ReadObject(memoryStream);
                }
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
What do you have to reference to get System.Runtime.Serialization.Json? – Svish May 4 '09 at 9:27
    
System.ServiceModel.Web and System.Runtime.Serialization – Chad Grant May 4 '09 at 9:47

You may want to create some sort of wrapping object that only exposes members of what it is wrapping if they are not null.

You may also want to check out version 4 of C#. From the wikipedia entry for duck typing:

Version 4 release of C# have extra type annotations that instruct the compiler to arrange for type checking of classes to occur at run-time rather than compile time, and include run-time type checking code in the compiled output. Such additions allow the language to enjoy most of the benefits of duck typing with the only drawback being the need to identify and specify such dynamic classes at compile time.

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