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We write a lot of JavaScript code to run our automated testing using a tool called TestComplete. In several cases I've set up inheritance trees using the following syntax:

function Parent()
{
    ...
    //some inline code here executes on object creation
}

Child.prototype = Parent;
Child.prototype.constructor = Child;
function Child()
{
    Parent.call(this);
    ...
}

The reason I've used

Child.prototype = Parent;

instead of

Child.prototype = new Parent();

is because there is code that is executed on the creation of a new object in the parent in some cases. Setting the prototype this way has never been an issue, in that I've always been able to call all the functions defined in the Parent after having created a Child.

I suspect, however, I've actually broken the prototype chain in doing this and I've been saved by the fact that all the methods we define are defined inline (ie. inside the constructor function) and not using the object.prototype.method = ... syntax, and so the fact the chain is broken has gone unnoticed.

So I have two questions; have I broken the chain, and what are the side effects of breaking the prototype chain in JavaScript?

share|improve this question
    
AFAIK you can't break the prototype chain because everything will inherit from Object anyway, which means there is always a chain back to Object. Could you clarify what you mean by breaking the chain? – Chris Biscardi Nov 18 '11 at 8:08
    
Sure. Check out this fiddle, jsfiddle.net/ZCT4M. You'll notice that only the first alert is displayed. If you change it to use new Parent() instead, all three alerts will display. – Bert Evans Nov 18 '11 at 8:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you "break" the prototype chain like this, you cannot access Parent.prototype.* methods and properties in Child instances and the instanceof operator does not work (new Child() instanceof Parent === false).

I understand why you don't want to use the new keyword for the inheritance. There is, however, a little trick to inherit the parent's prototype whilst not executing the parent's constructor:

var Parent = function () { ... };
var Child = function () {
  Parent.call(this);
  ...
};

var Fn = function () {};
Fn.prototype = Parent.prototype;
Child.prototype = new Fn();
Child.prototype.constructor = Child;
share|improve this answer
    
That's a neat trick, I'll try it out. I expect the hasOwnProperty method doesn't work either when the chain is broken. Can you think of anything else? – Bert Evans Nov 18 '11 at 9:06
    
hasOwnProperty is inherited from Object so it does work. But Parent.prototype.isPrototypeOf(new Child()) === false – Jan Kuča Nov 18 '11 at 9:17

Ok, this code will run for you and allows access to the prototype. It involves making the parent an object literal and you can call a prototype method in your child's "constructor"

var Parent = {
    testMethod1 : function() {
        alert('testMethod1');
    }
}

Parent.testMethod2 = function() {alert('testMethod2');}

Child.prototype = Parent;
//Child.prototype.constructor = Child;
function Child()
{
    alert('im ready');
    Child.prototype.testMethod1();  
}


var child1 = new Child();
child1.testMethod1();
child1.testMethod2();

Parent.testMethod3 = function() {alert('testMethod3');}
child1.testMethod3();

and if you wanted to do away with 'new' you could use Object.create()

var Parent = {
    testMethod1 : function() {
        alert('testMethod1');
    }
}

Parent.testMethod2 = function() {alert('testMethod2');}

var child1 = Object.create(Parent);
child1.testMethod1();
child1.testMethod2();

Parent.testMethod3 = function() {alert('testMethod3');}
child1.testMethod3();

Object.create = function (o) {
        function F() {}
        F.prototype = o;
        return new F();
    };

In the second case you would need to call a function as your "constructor" after you create()'d the object, but it's true protototypal inheritance.

share|improve this answer
    
That works, but I lose the ability to create different Parent instances. There are cases where I want to create multiple Parent objects. – Bert Evans Nov 18 '11 at 9:15
    
see Object.create() in my revised answer. – Chris Biscardi Nov 18 '11 at 9:18
    
That's closer but now I've lost the child constructor (and testMethod2, for example). Also, it won't execute code on creation, which is something I need to do. – Bert Evans Nov 18 '11 at 9:25
    
If you really want to use constructors than this coding style will not work for you... but you shouldn't have lost testMethod2. I just rechecked it in a jsfiddle and it works for me. – Chris Biscardi Nov 18 '11 at 9:33
    
You're right; I mis-read your code, testMethod2 is there, but it's now a method of Parent. In the fiddle example its a method of Child. I think probably what you want to do is child1.testMethod2 = function() {alert('testMethod2');}. This is definitely a more "javascripty" prototypal approach. – Bert Evans Nov 18 '11 at 9:40

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