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I am learning to code javascripts. In this script, I want a link to not go to its specified location, but to change the text in the paragraph before it. I have created a function to achieve it onclick, but the function is not able to return false.

<html>
<head>
    <title>Javascript Test #6</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        document.getElementById("links").onclick=writeData();
        function writeData()
            {
                document.getElementById("para").innerHTML="Changed Paragraph Content";
                return false;
            }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <p id="para">Unchanged Paragraph Content</p>
    <br/>
    <a id="links" href="javascript-return.html"> Click here to change the paragraph content </a>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
document.getElementById("links").onclick=writeData;

Don't use the brackets. They force your function to evaluate. but you want to assign the function.

EDIT:

Of Course, you need to Assign your Function after the Document has been loaded. The way it is right now, there will be no element with id links when the assignment is executed. Basically, just put your script block below the links element.

<html>
<head>
    <title>Javascript Test #6</title>
</head>
<body>
    <p id="para">Unchanged Paragraph Content</p>
    <br/>
    <a id="links" href="javascript-return.html"> Click here to change the paragraph content </a>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        document.getElementById("links").onclick=writeData;
        function writeData()
        {
            document.getElementById("para").innerHTML="Changed Paragraph Content";
            return false;
        }
    </script>
</body>
</html>

EDIT (Using window.onload):

<html>
<head>
    <title>Javascript Test #6</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        window.onload = function() {
            document.getElementById("links").onclick=writeData;
        }

        function writeData()
        {
            document.getElementById("para").innerHTML="Changed Paragraph Content";
            return false;
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <p id="para">Unchanged Paragraph Content</p>
    <br/>
    <a id="links" href="javascript-return.html"> Click here to change the paragraph content </a>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried that, even that doesn't work. It still goes to the link on click. –  Supratim Nayak Nov 18 '11 at 8:01
    
Please have a look at my Edit, might do the trick. You could also have a look at how to use the document ready event, if you want to keep your scripts in the head section, just google for javascript document ready event –  Chips_100 Nov 18 '11 at 8:04
1  
I tried assigning the function the way you mentioned (actually used the exact code). Didn't work. I am afraid it caused more problems. By default, the paragraph read "Changed Paragraph Content" instead of "Unchanged Paragraph Content" –  Supratim Nayak Nov 18 '11 at 8:07
1  
And @Chips_100 is document ready a jQuery event? The search results are mostly some jQuery articles. I still haven't gotten to jQuery. Sorry if I sound noobish, I have absolutely no idea other than what I've learnt so far. –  Supratim Nayak Nov 18 '11 at 8:10
1  
Thanks @Chips_100 The prob's solved. –  Supratim Nayak Nov 18 '11 at 8:16

When dealing with document.getElementById, you should ensure that at the time of the call, the elements are in DOM. Just use an inline click handler:

<html>
    <head>
    <title>Javascript Test #6</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function writeData()
        {
            document.getElementById("para").innerHTML="Changed Paragraph Content";
            return false;
        }
    </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p id="para">Unchanged Paragraph Content</p>
        <br/>
        <a id="links" href="javascript-return.html" onclick="return writeData();">    Click here       to change the paragraph content </a>
    </body>
 </html>

Or, change the order of things: first have the DOM ready, and after that , insert you js script:

<html>
    <head>
    <title>Javascript Test #6</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <p id="para">Unchanged Paragraph Content</p>
        <br/>
        <a id="links" href="javascript-return.html" onclick="return writeData();">    Click here       to change the paragraph content </a>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            document.getElementById("links").onclick=writeData;
            function writeData()
            {
                document.getElementById("para").innerHTML="Changed Paragraph Content";
                return false;
            }
        </script>
    </body>
 </html>

see it in action here: http://jsfiddle.net/2CpcF/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Alex Pacurar –  Supratim Nayak Nov 18 '11 at 8:16
    
I have actually tried the first method before trying this out. But felt that it may be uncomfortable to call JS functions in the HTML body (when coding considerably longer pages). The main intention is to hide the JS from body (I am going to use an external JS file and try after this). Just curious, is this the general practice? Though the second method solves the purpose for now, it is not practical to write JS codes in the HTML body right? –  Supratim Nayak Nov 18 '11 at 8:27

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