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Does anyone have any idea what is wrong with this query? I am trying to do an innerjoin to a different database on the same server.

SELECT b.company, i.CONCOM, 
    COALESCE (SUM(CASE WHEN C.CATEGORY_ID = '30' THEN 0 ELSE t .LOGMINS END), 0) AS TotalWithoutNew, 
    COALESCE (SUM(t.LOGMINS), 0) AS TotalAllId
FROM helpdesk3.dbo.INQUIRY AS i
INNER JOIN [Check].[dbo].[tbl_companies] As B ON 
    i.CONCOM, B.company
INNER JOIN TIMELOG AS t ON 
    t.INQUIRY_ID = i.INQUIRY_ID 
INNER JOIN PROD AS P ON 
    i.PROD_ID =  P.PROD_ID
INNER JOIN CATEGORY AS C ON 
    P.CATEGORY_ID = C.CATEGORY_ID 
WHERE (DATEPART(yyyy, ESCDATE)  =2011)
GROUP BY i.CONCOM 
ORDER BY totalwithoutnew desc
share|improve this question
1  
Is there any error or unexpected result? – Filip Popović Nov 18 '11 at 9:24
    
I hope the actual query does not contain a "space" character after t (ELSE t .LOGMINS) as it is visible in the question. – Aziz Shaikh Nov 18 '11 at 9:28
    
Sorry that was a formatting error - the query errors with Msg 4145, Level 15, State 1, Line 3 An expression of non-boolean type specified in a context where a condition is expected, near ','. Line 3 in the query where I am running is Line 5 and 6 on this question. Query worked fine before I put the first inner join in! – Trinitrotoluene Nov 18 '11 at 9:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your first join

    INNER JOIN [Check].[dbo].[tbl_companies] As B ON 
        i.CONCOM, B.company

has columns list instead of join predicate. You probably meant i.CONCOM = B.company.

The other problem might be in your fully qualified name of table tbl_companies. As stated in this article:

To refer to a column, there are three choices: fully qualified, partially qualified, and unqualified. A fully qualified name (written as db_name.tbl_name.col_name) is completely specified. A partially qualified name (written as tbl_name.col_name) refers to a column in the named table. An unqualified name (written simply as col_name) refers to whatever table is indicated by the surrounding context.

share|improve this answer
    
@aF copied your answer and stole your credit. He does that, he tried to do the same to me. +1 from me – t-clausen.dk Nov 18 '11 at 13:51
    
@t-clausen.dk that's wrong. – aF. Nov 18 '11 at 14:12
    
@aF Very funny, you deleted your answer for this question after i voted you down and wrote my comment. stackoverflow.com/questions/8182601/… – t-clausen.dk Nov 18 '11 at 14:47
    
@t-clausen.dk that's true because it was like you said. But not here. – aF. Nov 18 '11 at 14:51

Isn't it this:

INNER JOIN [Check].[dbo].[tbl_companies] As B ON 
    i.CONCOM, B.company

Ypu should have this:

INNER JOIN [Check].[dbo].[tbl_companies] As B ON 
    i.CONCOM = B.company
share|improve this answer
1  
Spot on - thank you! – Trinitrotoluene Nov 18 '11 at 9:41
    
Once again you steal answers ! – t-clausen.dk Nov 18 '11 at 13:51

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