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I am currently using Eclipse (Indigo Service Release 1) for Android development. When I do try to "commit" changes which I make to a specific project, I am prompted to commit all the files under "bin" directory.

I do not want to commit it and a simpler solution is to un-check them all every time I commit. However this is getting annoying and I was wondering if there is a permanent fix to it.

I tried :

Preferences -> Team -> Ignore Resources -> Add Pattern with "bin" as the added pattern.

However it doesn't really provide a permanent solution.

Any suggestions?

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1  
This might help –  Krishnabhadra Nov 18 '11 at 9:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 27 down vote accepted

You need to set the svn:ignore property.

From within Eclipse this is best achieved by right clicking on the bin directory (in Package Explorer/Navigator). Then select Team -> Add to svn:ignore and in the subsequent dialog select "Resource(s) by name".

When you next commit the project the newly set svn:ignore properties will be committed too and the bin directory (and contents) will be permanently excluded.

Steps:

  1. Turn off automatic build and clean the project.
  2. If the directory is already committed, do Team -> revert, delete it (deleting in Eclipse will do an svn delete) and then commit this change.
  3. Now recreate the directory (running your build may do this)
  4. Then on the directory select Team -> Add to svn:ignore and in the subsequent dialog select "Resource(s) by name".
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Strangely enough I do not have svn:ignore highlighted. So I went to folder -> right click -> set property -> svn:ignore (which I chose from the drop-down). Still no effect. Do you happen to know why is it not even highlighted? Or presumably am I doing something very stupid? :) –  Rajat Anantharam Nov 18 '11 at 10:07
3  
Has the bin directory already been committed? If so you must first do an SVN delete, then commit and then try the svn:ignore on the unversion-controlled file (it should have a ? on the icon) The fact that you're able to access the svn properties for that directory suggests it's already been committed. –  earcam Nov 18 '11 at 12:35
    
Ah, I got it fixed. It was not showing up since there still was a .svn file lurking in the deep. Thanks a zillion! –  Rajat Anantharam Nov 18 '11 at 15:52
1  
Hi @RajatAnantharam, glad that helped. Just so you know, if an answer solves your problem you can now mark it accepted - this shows up as percentage acceptance when you ask further questions. You can also vote on any question or answer you find that useful –  earcam Nov 20 '11 at 16:45

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