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I have a piece of C# code in which I use the goto statement. Is this a correct use of the goto statement or is there a better alternative solution?

bool IsValid(TestObject aObject)
{
   bool aRetVal = false;

   if(condition here)
       goto exit;
   if(condition here)
       goto exit;
   if(condition here)
       goto exit;

   aRetVal = true;
   exit:
   return aRetVal;
}

The reason I'm doing this is because I don't want multiple exit points in my method.

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3  
Rather than using GoTo, use return statement. –  Pawan Mishra Nov 18 '11 at 10:30
    
Why don't you want multiple exit points in the method? I think it is more clear just to return imediatly. –  Henrik Jepsen Nov 18 '11 at 10:32
2  
I don't want multiple exit points in my function. why so? –  Azodious Nov 18 '11 at 10:32
1  
This seems relevant xkcd.com/292 –  Purplegoldfish Nov 18 '11 at 10:34
    
...because it break Dijkstra's edict that functions should only have a single exit point? IMO, if you're contriving your code to satisfy Dijkstra then it's probably not worth following his advice. I think it came from an era when functions could cover hundreds of lines. If you keep your methods concise, I'm not sure it matters. –  spender Nov 18 '11 at 10:51
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7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No - use return instead. Why force someone reading your code to skip to an exit point and then return? You know everything you need to do at this point - so the clearest solution is to return, IMO.

The "don't have multiple exit points" idea was appropriate in languages where you'd need to do things like cleanup on the exit of a function, but between garbage collection and finally blocks, it's pointless and counterproductive in C#.

What do you want to do if the condition is met? Return from the method. So make your code say that. Wherever you can make the code say exactly what you mean, that's a good thing. Don't make it more complicated than it needs to be.

I'm assuming your real situation is more complicated than just these conditions, otherwise I'd use something like Marcelo's answer, but probably written as:

return !(condition1 || condition2 || condition3);
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1  
Just what I was thinking. :-) –  Marcelo Cantos Nov 18 '11 at 10:34
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No. Just write this:

return !(<condition 1> || <condition 2> || <condition 3>);
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Goto is bad! It's unstructured programming. Why they kept it in C# is a mystery to me... You can do fine without goto.

bool IsValid(TestObject aObject)
{
   return ((condition here) || (condition here) || (condition here));
}

Better, no?

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Have you ever looked at a decompiled foreach? –  Oded Nov 18 '11 at 10:32
2  
What does that have to do with this? –  Roy Dictus Nov 18 '11 at 10:33
1  
It is implemented with goto. –  Oded Nov 18 '11 at 10:33
1  
That the compiler generates MSIL with goto statements is normal. It is MSIL after all, not C#. You don't need goto in any language that has proper structure features such as C# (while, if, foreach, ...). –  Roy Dictus Nov 18 '11 at 10:35
1  
@Oded: Not really. In IL pretty much everything is implemented with branch instructions, but that's the appropriate level of abstraction. At the C# level then foreach is just foreach, plain and simple. –  LukeH Nov 18 '11 at 10:36
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I don't want multiple exit points in my function.

Please explain why not.

This is not a good use of goto. It can be easily circumvented:

bool IsValid(TestObject aObject)
{
    bool aRetVal = false;

    if(condition here)
    {
        //don't goto exit; do other work instead
    }
    else if(condition here)
    {
        // don't goto exit; do other work instead
    }else if(condition here)
    {
        // don't goto exit; do other work instead
    }
    else
    {
        aRetVal = true;
    }

   return aRetVal;
}

Or, if you don't need to do other work when your contitions match, you can easily do the following:

bool IsValid(TestObject aObject)
{
   return !((condition1 here) || (condition2 here) || (condition3 here));
}
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No, it's not a good use of goto and it's not necessary. How about this instead?

bool IsValid(TestObject aObject)
{
    if (condition here)
        return false;

    if (condition here)
        return false;

    if (condition here)
        return false;

    return true;
}
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In your specific case, the gotodoesn't clarify the code. When I read the code, I have to read the condition, find the goto label and read the code beneath the label. Which is a lot of work and the reader will be rapidly tired and will make errors.

When I write code, I try to bear in mind that it'll be read more than written. I try to take care of my beloved readers: I think KISS (Keep It Simple, Supid) and fight complexity.

In the book Code Complete, there's an article about the use of GOTO. It could worth the reading.

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I'd rather do this:

bool IsValid(TestObject aObject)
{
   bool aRetVal = true;

   if(aRetVal && condition here)
       aRetVal = false;

   if(aRetVal && condition here)
       aRetVal = false;

   if(aRetVal && condition here)
       aRetVal = false;

   return aRetVal;
}

Or just return false;, as others have suggested.

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Suppose the "condition" evaluation has side-effects - e.g. the first condition checks whether aObject is null, and the second uses a property of aObject - you don't want to evaluate the second condition if the first has failed. –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '11 at 10:35
    
then you do if (aRetVal && cond2). that's still no reason to do everything plus saving the world in a single line. –  imre Nov 18 '11 at 10:38
1  
If you can express three simple conditions in a single expression, I see no reason why not to - and if you already know you're going to return false, why not just do so immediately? –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '11 at 10:39
    
sure, if they are simple (and we don't know if they are or are not from the original post). also, the OP explicitly stated that he does not want early returns (though we don't know why...). so yeah, i agree that sometimes it's best to write a composite condition, sometimes it's best to write early returns, and then there are some cases when neither is the best. –  imre Nov 18 '11 at 10:44
    
If we really wanted to keep going, I'd use if / else if / else if. My main point is that your answer is not semantically equivalent, which should surely be the most important starting point. –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '11 at 10:47
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