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for object serialization I created a DataTransferObject-Pendant for each of my objects. Each original object gets a ToDTO()-method that returns the appropriate DTO-Object with the properties to be saved . Most of my original objects are inherited from an other, so I would want each inheritance-level to care for their own properties. A simple example:

class base
{
  private string _name;

  public DTO_base ToDTO()
  {
    DTO_base result = new DTO_base();
    result.Name = _name;
    return result;
  }
}

The inherited class should override the ToDTO() method, calling the parents method and adding its own properties to be saved, like:

class inherited : base
{
  private string _description;

  public new DTO_inherited ToDTO()
  {
    DTO_inherited result = base.ToDTO();
    result.Description = _description;
    return result;
  }
}

Obviously, this wont work, because base.ToDTO() returns a DTO_base object. Can anyone suggest, how this feature would be implemented best?

Thanks in advance,
Frank

share|improve this question
    
base is a keyword don't use such words for naming –  Nighil Nov 18 '11 at 11:27
    
Yes, you are right. I just named them for the example, not in my actual code. But nevertheless, I should have find a non-keyword-name –  Aaginor Nov 18 '11 at 13:06
    
"@base" should work :) –  mikalai Nov 18 '11 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would use a Template Method:

class baseCls
{
  private string _name;

  public DTO_base ToDTO()
  {
    DTO_base result = createDTO();
    result.Name = _name;
    setAdditionalData(result);
    return result;
  }

  protected abstract DTO_base createDTO();
  protected abstract void setAdditionalData(DTO_base dto);
}

class inherited : baseCls
{
  private string _description;

  protected override DTO_base createDTO() {
    return new DTO_inerited();
  }
  protected override void setAdditionalData(DTO_base dto) {
     inherited i = (DTO_inherited)dto;
     i.Description = _Description;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that tip! I think I'm going to use a mixture - a public method that returns the DTO and a protected one to fill the data. Instead of 'override' I'll use 'new' so I can change the return type. –  Aaginor Nov 18 '11 at 14:40
    
Be careful with new, since it has another semantic then override when using the operation on the base type. –  H-Man2 Nov 18 '11 at 14:48
    
Hm, good point. I finally decide that I can live with the ToDTO() method returning the base object, using the template method. Thanks for your help and comments :) –  Aaginor Nov 29 '11 at 16:42

If you really want to have the DTO creation logic in your business objects, I would go for a generic approach.

class Base<TDTO> where TDTO : BaseDTO, new()
{
    private string _name;

    public TDTO ToDTO()
    {
        TDTO dto = new TDTO();
        SetupDTO(dto);
        return dto;
    }

    protected virtual void SetupDTO(TDTO dto)
    {
        dto.Name = _name;
    }
}


class Inherited : Base<InheritedDTO>
{
    private string _description;

    protected override void SetupDTO(TDTO dto)
    {
        base.SetupDTO(dto);

        dto.Description = _description;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 because the usage of new() is cool :-) Unfortunately, I'm forced to use Java at work. –  H-Man2 Nov 18 '11 at 11:44
    
I'm not set to have the creation method in the business logic, but i thought it would be a good idea, that the business logic knows how to create it's own DTO-representation. I already thought about Generics, but they seemed to be not fitting for this scenario, basically because generic imply that you can inherit from the base class using any TDTO. Anyway, the idea of using a protected helper method to fill sounds fine. I think I will have some more thoughts into it. Thanks! –  Aaginor Nov 18 '11 at 13:04
    
Aaginor, if the answer was helpful for you, you should accept it. Otherwise add an answer by yourself and accept that. Thanks! –  Florian Greinacher Nov 20 '11 at 11:36

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