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Simple question - what would better for a medium/big size database with requirement for compatibility with ACID in 2012.

I have read it all (well most) about mySQL vs pgSQL but most of those posts relate to version 4,5.1 and 7,8 respectively and are quite dated (2008,2009). Its almost 2012 now so I guess we could try and take a fresh look at the issue.

Basically I would like to know if there is anything in PostgreSQL that out-weights ease of use, availability and larger developer/knowledge base of MySQL.

Is MySQL's query optimizer still stupid? Is it still super slow on very complicated queries?

Hit me! :)

PS. And don't send me to goggle or wiki. I am looking for few specific points not an overview + I trust StackOverflow more than some random page with 'smart guy' shining his light.

Addendum

Size of the project: Say an ordering system with roughly 10-100 orders/day per account, couple of thousand accounts, eventually, each can have several hundred to several thousand users.

Better at: being future proof and flexible when it comes to growing and changing requirements. Performance is also important as to keep costs low in hardware department. Also availability of skilled workforce would be a factor.

OLTP or OLAP: OLTP

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5  
You'd need to define a few things more accurately and precisely for any answer to be useful. Words like "better" and "moderately". Better at giving your DBA's time to sleep, or better for your new hires with a recent MySQL exam in their head? Moderately for a CD collection index, or a messaging application with 10 million users? OLTP, OLAP? –  ptomli Nov 18 '11 at 11:29
    
what is a a medium/big size database for you ? –  Hugues Van Landeghem Feb 27 '12 at 22:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Is MySQL's query optimizer still stupid? Is it still super slow on very complicated queries?

All query optimizers are stupid at times. PostgreSQL's is less stupid in most cases. Some of PostgreSQL's more recent SQL features (windowing functions, recursive WITH queries etc) are very powerful but if you have a dumb ORM they might not be usable.

Size of the project: Say an ordering system with roughly 10-100 orders/day per account, couple of thousand accounts, eventually, each can have several hundred to several thousand users.

Doesn't sound that large - well within reach of a big box.

Better at: being future proof and flexible when it comes to growing and changing requirements.

PostgreSQL has a strong developer team, with an extended community of contributors. Release policy is strict, with bugfixes-only in the point releases. Always track the latest release of 9.1.x for the bugfixes.

MySQL has had a somewhat more relaxed attitude to version numbers in the past. That may change with Oracle being in charge. I'm not familiar with the policies of the various forks.

Performance is also important as to keep costs low in hardware department.

I'd be surprised if hardware turned out to be a major component in a project this size.

Also availability of skilled workforce would be a factor.

That's your key decider. If you've got a team of experienced Perl + PostgreSQL hackers sat around idle, use that. If your people know Lisp and MySQL then use that.

OLTP or OLAP: OLTP

PostgreSQL has always been strong on OLTP.

My personal viewpoint is that the PostgreSQL mailing list are full of polite, helpful, knowledgeable people. You have direct contact with users with Terabyte databases and hackers who have built major parts of the code. The quality of the support is truly excellent.

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Nice explanation, thank you! –  RandomWhiteTrash Nov 24 '11 at 11:22
    
@Richard another point Postgres alter queries run in background –  ravz Dec 14 '13 at 4:47

PostgreSQL is a lot more advanced when it comes to SQL features.

Things that MySQL still doesn't have (and PostgreSQL has):

  • deferrable constraints
  • check constraints
  • full outer join
  • regular expressions don't work with UTF-8
  • table functions ( select * from my_function() )
  • common table expressions
  • recursive queries (using common table expressions)
  • windowing functions
  • function based index
  • partial index
  • full text search on transactional tables (MySQL 5.6 supports this now as well)
  • GIS features on transactional tables
  • MINUS or INTERSECT operator
  • you cannot use a temporary table twice in the same select statement
  • you cannot use the table being changed (update/delete/insert) in a sub-select
  • transactional DDL
  • roles (groups) to manage user privileges

Not sure what you call "ease of use" but there are several SQL features that I would not want to miss (CTEs, windowing functions) that would define "ease of use" for me.

Now PostgreSQL is not perfect and probably the most obnoxious thing can be, to tune the dreaded VACUUM process for a heavy write database.

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As an addition to @a_horse_with_no_name answer, I want to name some features which I like so much in PostgreSQL:

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One of my favourite things about Postgres is that (at the time of writing) it has the most accurate implemetation (to my knowledge) of the SQL Standard with regard to Grouping. You cannot group by columns unless they are contained in an aggregate function or in the group by clause, or functionally dependant on a column contained in the group by clause, so if you include a primary key column of a table in the group by clause, you don't have to include all other columns in that table. Example on SQL Fiddle –  GarethD Sep 4 '13 at 11:20
    
@GarethD WOW! Didn't know that. Now I wish my next job be PostgreSQL one even more!!! –  Roman Pekar Sep 4 '13 at 11:27
    
MySQL allows you to do this as well, but it also allows you to simply leave out any columns you aren't concerned with. The value of those columns in the results is undefined except in the case you describe for, as would be expected. –  rich remer Jun 18 at 22:59

Here are some benchmarks using these exact versions:

http://posulliv.github.io/2012/06/29/mysql-postgres-bench/

My take was that MySQL was about 30% faster for simple tasks and 500% slower for more complex queries, likely due to the query optimiser.

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Testing read performance is only part of the picture. Ealier MySQL versions did not handle concurrent read and write access very well but I think this has improved with 5.5. A sound benchmark has to include as most real world application also write to the database (some more some less). –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 2 '13 at 8:58

PostgreSQL is a more mature database, it has a longer history, it is more ANSI SQL compliant, its query optimizer is significantly better. MySQL has different storage engines like MyISAM, InnoDB, in-memory, all of them are incompatible in a sense that an SQL query which runs on one engine may produce a syntax error when executed on another engine. Stored procedures are better in PostgreSQL.

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