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I have created two 1 dimensional, column arrays using numpy - one having 100 cells, and the second 10000 cells. What I want to do now is to write 2 dimensional array having for every cell in first array (the one with 100 elements) written all 10000 values from the second array. Little example explaining it:

a = 
  [[1],
   [2],
   [3]]

b =  
  [[4],
   [5]]

And I'd like to obtain:

c = [[1], [4],
     [1], [5],
     [2], [4],
     [2], [5],
     [3], [4],
     [3], [5]]

I was trying to find any solution, but I was unsuccessful. I hope to find help here. Cheers, Jonh

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I think you can take a look at the functions np.repeat and np.tile. –  joris Nov 18 '11 at 12:03

2 Answers 2

Is this what you want? I used the function np.repeat to repeat each individual element (first array) and np.tile to repeat the whole array (second array).

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.array([[1],[2],[3]])
>>> b = np.array([[4],[5]])
>>> 
>>> at = np.repeat(a, len(b), axis = 0)
>>> at
array([[1],
       [1],
       [2],
       [2],
       [3],
       [3]])
>>> bt = np.tile(b, (len(a), 1))
>>> bt
array([[4],
       [5],
       [4],
       [5],
       [4],
       [5]])
>>> np.concatenate((at, bt), axis = 1)
array([[1, 4],
       [1, 5],
       [2, 4],
       [2, 5],
       [3, 4],
       [3, 5]])
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Thank you! That's exactly what wanted to obtain. –  John Smith Nov 18 '11 at 16:00

You want itertools.product.

In [2]: import itertools

In [3]: scipy.array(list(itertools.product([1,2,3], [4,5])))
Out[3]: 
array([[1, 4],
       [1, 5],
       [2, 4],
       [2, 5],
       [3, 4],
       [3, 5]])
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This is indeed also a nice (short and readable) solution, but a small remark: if you are using numpy arrays (and need numpy arrays as a result), the solution with numpy functions is faster than working with lists and itertools (certainly when the arrays grow in size). –  joris Nov 22 '11 at 17:54

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