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I am trying to learn a bit about optimizing my jQuery code...

Is there a way to improve the code below so that the variable $selected is declared outside of the function, but still accessible, so that the DOM is not traversed every time?

Or is this code about as optimized as it could be?

Or... I suppose I may be misunderstanding how and when jquery DOM traversal happens.

$('#full-width-layout_c1_col-1-1_1').on(
    'mouseenter mouseleave click', 
    'a.project_open, a.song_open', 
    function(e) {
        var $selected = $(this).closest('tr').find('div');
        if (e.type == 'mouseenter') {
            $selected.addClass("hovered");
        }
        else if (e.type == 'mouseleave'){
            $selected.removeClass("hovered");
        }
        else if (e.type == 'click'){
            $selected.addClass('opened');
        }
    }
);
share|improve this question
    
sorry I've overlooked performance optimization requirement. I've removed my answer – sll Nov 18 '11 at 12:02
1  
The js code is looking good, further optimizations (potentially) would require you to post the HTML itself. – WTK Nov 18 '11 at 12:04
    
The HTML is all dynamically generated via a jquery template and fed with json data creating a table... which is why when i hover I need to traverse up to the specific row then down again the div and add a class to it. I guess this really is as far as I can go with optimization unless the .data method turns out to be a winner. – gordyr Nov 18 '11 at 12:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't use jQuery.data() if you want every last bit of performance when storing arbitrary data in the DOM elements. That would perform much better:

var $selected = this.closestdiv;

if(!$selected) { // first time
    $selected = $(this).closest('tr').find('div');
    this.closestdiv = $selected;
}

From this simple benchmark http://jsperf.com/jquerydata/4 you can see how faster it is to store data directly on DOM rather then using jQuery.data(). On my machine using jQuery.data() is 97% slower than storing data directly. Again, fair word of warning - jQuery.data() has certain amount of overhead because it's trying to be smart about things and prevent potential memory leaks.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I'm experiencing it being 45 times as fast! Good to know. – pimvdb Nov 18 '11 at 12:24
    
.data is 98% slower for me, so plain storing is in fact 4900% faster (50 times faster). – pimvdb Nov 18 '11 at 12:35
    
Good catch :))) – WTK Nov 18 '11 at 12:39
    
Fantastic stuff WTK... Many thanks for this.. It's really opened my eyes! Huge props to both you and pimvdb for getting me to a solution that will work fantasticll throughout my app and not just in the example code I gave. Sorry pimvdb but I have the give the 'tick' to WTK for this. Cheers both of you! – gordyr Nov 18 '11 at 13:18

You can use some sort of caching - when an element is clicked, store $selected as data to the element, so that any next times $selected is fetched from the element, instead of by doing a DOM traversal:

var $selected = $(this).data("closestdiv");

if(!$selected) { // first time
    $selected = $(this).closest('tr').find('div');
    $(this).data("closestdiv", $selected);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Would be good, except that jQuery.data() is horribly slow when compared to storing directly on DOM nodes. On the other hand, there's reason to it - preventing memory leaks. – WTK Nov 18 '11 at 12:01
    
At first glance this looks great... So, just to clarify, using the above technique I can assign the data on hover, mousenter and click... Then when the event takes place again, it doesn't have to traverse the DOM, making repeat hovers/clicks faster? If I am understanding this correctly it is exactly what I am looking for. – gordyr Nov 18 '11 at 12:03
    
@gordyr: Yes, you're correct. Note though that when you change the DOM, this is not reflected since simply no DOM traversals are done anymore after the first time. Plus, according to @WTK .data is still slow, but I'd have to test out what weighs more. – pimvdb Nov 18 '11 at 12:04
    
@gordyr: OK well caching is about 50% faster on Chrome: jsperf.com/using-cache-to-avoid-dom-traversal. – pimvdb Nov 18 '11 at 12:16
1  
To backup my point about data being slow: jsperf.com/jquerydata/4 If you're not doing something weird with the divs that would trigger memory leaks, check my answer for even better performing solution. – WTK Nov 18 '11 at 12:23

Since you're selecting on an ID, and I assume that you have only one element with this ID, you could have this outside your event handler:

var $selected = $('#full-width-layout_c1_col-1-1_1').closest('tr').find('div');

This also assumes that no DOM manipulation will be going on that might change what is returned by the above statement.

EDIT: Never mind. I misread. Sorry.

share|improve this answer
    
No worries, thanks for your time though :-) – gordyr Nov 18 '11 at 12:04

Without seeing your HTML it is difficult to be sure, but I suspect that you can't look up which DIV to modify because it's different for each anchor that is clicked on. That being the case, you need to traverse the DOM from the clicked/hovered element each time.

share|improve this answer
    
You're entirely correct, my apologies i should have been more speciic in my question – gordyr Nov 18 '11 at 11:59

This is not the answer, but there is little opportunity to reduce the code:

$('#full-width-layout_c1_col-1-1_1').on(
    'mouseenter mouseleave click', 
    'a.project_open, a.song_open', 
    function(e) {
        var $selected = $(this).closest('tr').find('div');
        if (e.type === 'click'){
            $selected.addClass('opened');
        } else {
            $selected.toggleClass('hovered');
    }
);
share|improve this answer

You could use a closure:

(function () {//scoping function
    var $selected = $(this).closest('tr').find('div');

    $('#full-width-layout_c1_col-1-1_1').on(
    'mouseenter mouseleave click', 
    'a.project_open, a.song_open', 
    function(e) {
        if (e.type == 'mouseenter') {
            $selected.addClass("hovered");
        }
        else if (e.type == 'mouseleave'){
            $selected.removeClass("hovered");
        }
        else if (e.type == 'click'){
            $selected.addClass('opened');
        }
    }
    );


}()); //end scoping function

This would make the search for the div happen only once.

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