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This must be easy for you

Here is file1 (one column)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

and here is file2 (two columns)

2 yay
3 ups
4 wow
8 hey

There must be a simple one liner to print out lines in file1 that don´t match to file2

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1  
Note that the join and comm solutions require the input files to be sorted, which they happen to be in this question. The awk solution does not care if not sorted. –  glenn jackman Nov 18 '11 at 16:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted
 awk 'NR==FNR{a[$1]++;next;}!($0 in a)' file2 file1

or using join with -v, as @Michael suggested:

join -v1 file1 file2

both will print :

1
5
6
7
9
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Can you please explain your awk one-liner for +1? :) –  jaypal Nov 18 '11 at 18:12
3  
@Jaypal the awk save file2 in an array, index is field1; then for each line in file1 check if it is an index of the array, to do the comparation. the ++ is nothing special but set a value to the element. a[$1]=1; works too. but ++ is faster for typing. :) –  Kent Nov 18 '11 at 21:28

You can do this by combining cut and comm:

cut -d' ' -f1 file2 | comm -13 - file1

You might also consider join, depending on how you want to handle repeated lines.

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This sed solution might work for you:

{ seq 1 10; echo -e "2 yay\n3 ups\n4 wow\n8 hey"; } | sort -n | 
sed '1{h;d};H;${x;s/\(\S\+\)\n\1[^\n]*\n//g;p};d'
1
5
6
7
9
10

Explanation: Sort the files numerically then using sed slurp the file in to the hold space (HS). At end of file swap to the HS and then delete lines with the duplicate keys.

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