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I have a method like the following:

public void ImportDataCommand()
{
    // some data validation logic here

    if (some_criteria_is_true)
    {
        // Call to a method which uses sql queries to update some records
        UpdateRecords();
    }
    else
    {
        // Call to a method which uses sql queries to delete some records
        DeleteRecords();
    }
}
  • How can I unit test methods UpdateRecords() and DeleteRecords()? (if possible)
  • Is the current pattern that I have, a smell?
  • Is there a better way to handle, when you have some data updation logic, which depends on some data validation logic and some conditional logic?

Any help in this regard is greatly appreciated. Please let me know, if you need more information or if something is not clear.

Update:

I am not interested in mocking the data source here. I want to make sure if my sql queries are correct and are doing the right updates. Sorry for the confusion, if you thought, I wanted to test my validation logic as opposed to my data updation logic (sql).

I do have experience with mocking frameworks and I did use them successfully to write unit tests for my normal application logic.

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Your method doesn't return anything - usually, a unit test will give you a bunch of parameters, and test that the returned values match expectation. –  Neville K Nov 18 '11 at 12:06
    
@Neville: Right. Lets say, I want to test an application command, which stores/updates data into database. Is there a way to do that? - I have successfully written unit tests for my normal application logic, using NUnit. –  Mahesh Velaga Nov 18 '11 at 12:09
    
The common way to do this is to use a mocking framework, so you can decouple your test from the specific database underneath it. –  Neville K Nov 18 '11 at 12:22
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem starts with the phrase 'as well as'.

Don't have validation and data access in the same class - delegate the data access to another class and inject it - this way you can mock out the data source when testing your validation.

class Bar {
private DataAccessService service

public void Foo()
{
    // some data validation logic here

    if (some_criteria_is_true)
    {
        // Call to a method which uses sql queries to update some records
        service.updateBarRecords();
    }
    else
    {
        // Call to a method which uses sql queries to delete some records
        service.deleteBarRecords();
    }
}

}

You can then use a mocking framework to test that the correct service methods are called.

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Sorry for the confusion. I wanted to test my data updation logic not the validation logic. Please see the update that I made to the question. –  Mahesh Velaga Nov 18 '11 at 12:27
    
If Foo() is not the method you want to test then maybe you should ask a question about how to test UpdateBarRecords() ... –  blank Nov 18 '11 at 12:33
    
You are right. I updated my question to reflect that, now. Thanks. –  Mahesh Velaga Nov 18 '11 at 12:53
    
Leaky abstraction breaking encapsulation is leaky. –  Ian Boyd May 9 '12 at 18:14
    
@IanBoyd Pardon? –  blank May 9 '12 at 19:25
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This depends on the whole architecture of your application and the IT/DB infrastructure of the company as well as data policies you could be enforced to follow by DBAs, in mid size or big companies.

in the past people used to have an instance of SQLite for unit tests, or you can have the same technology for example SQL Server but have unit tests to connect to development or QA database servers, surely not production.

One thing I did in the past was to have a transaction around the command executions and rollback the transaction at the end, in the unit tests, so nothing is ever persisted on the DEV/QA databases but the testing of command execution is performed anyway.

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You usually mock a DB itself to do unit testing right rather than doing it on a production DB where in you gotta take care of rolling back and stuffs. What i have seen from previous projects is that, they do use preprocessor directives for NUNIT build and then redirect the SQL execution to a different (injection) DB all together, where in you need not care for a rolling back or what so ever. Just delete after every thing is done is kool. :) –  zenwalker Nov 18 '11 at 12:23
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When you do unit testing, you concentrate particularly only on that unit i.e a method here. So when you write a test case, you mock the other methods which you usually call via a dependency injection (if its a API call or some thing). Other wise, what that method does you just guess and write the test case.

So in your code case, you are suppose to write a test cases for Foo(), UpdateBarRecords() and DeleteBarRecords() seperately.

Ignore all the method calls (unit testing it) and concentrate on the core logic code you have written in that method which you are concentrating for unit testing.

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IMHO you should address this issues in your code:

  1. Foo is not unit-testeable, because it doesn't return anything
  2. You're coupling data access to your app logic, that makes different layers too tied together to actually unit test them
  3. Probably a method in which you call update and delete depending on a certain condition is a smell... shouldn't be better to have two different behaviors?

Since the naming of Foo is not self explanatory there's no much else, but if you could detail the context of the method we could add more remarks.

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2  
Not returning something does not make it impossible to test –  blank Nov 18 '11 at 12:23
    
@Bedwyr, unless I'm missing something I do confirm: you can test visible effects of the method once is executed, but you cannot unit-test the method itself. –  mamoo Nov 18 '11 at 12:26
    
You can test that the method has the correct behaviour - it must do something - and that is what you can test, either by asserting that state has changed somewhere else in the class or that the method calls expected methods on a dependancy. –  blank Nov 18 '11 at 12:30
    
@Bedwyr I think we're actually saying the same thing ;) . My remark is that - strictly speaking - a unit test is a test of a "unit" of software. Testing dependencies is not testing that unit, is testing (a part of) the system, which is definitely not unit testing. –  mamoo Nov 18 '11 at 12:35
    
.. but if you've mocked your dependencies then you're not testing those - so what's left? –  blank Nov 18 '11 at 12:44
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