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Every so often I find myself wanting to apply a collection of functions on several collections of parameters. It's easy to do with map and a very simple function.

(map
  (fn invoke [f & args] (apply f args))
  [- + *]
  [1 2 3]
  [1 2 3]
  [1 2 3])

 (-1 6 27)

Searching the web turns up quite a few libraries that define a similar function, often called funcall or invoke. Because of Clojure's penchant for variadic functions, I cannot help but think there should already be a default version of this function.

Is there, or is there another idiomatic way to solve situations like this ?

Edit:

Another form may be

(map
  (comp eval list)
  [- + *]
  [1 2 3]
  [1 2 3]
  [1 2 3])

 (-1 6 27)

Which scares me because of the eval.

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8 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There isn't a funcall or equivalent function in the standard Clojure library that works exactly this way. "apply" is pretty close but needs a collection of arguments at the end rather than being purely variadic.

With this in mind, you can "cheat" with apply to make it work as follows by adding an infinite list of nils to the end (which get considered as empty sequences of additional arguments):

(map apply [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] (repeat nil))
=> (-1 6 27)

Overall though, I think the sensible approach if you really want to use this function frequently is just to define it:

(defn funcall [f & ps]
  (apply f ps))

(map funcall [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3])
=> (-1 6 27)
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So what you say is if the last apply parameter is a nil, it somehow gets interpreted as a sequence ? (apply + 1 2 3 nil) does work. Pretty interesting, I do hope thats intentional though because it might come in VERY handy. –  NielsK Nov 19 '11 at 13:33
1  
Yes - nil is considered as an empty sequence pretty much consistently throughout Clojure. e.g. (vec nil) => [] or (seq []) => nil. You can rely on this behaviour. –  mikera Nov 19 '11 at 14:13
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If you really don't have a clue about the function name, but you know what the in- and output have to be, you can try https://github.com/Raynes/findfn.

(find-arg [-1 6 27] map '% [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3])
;=> (clojure.core/trampoline)

This tells us that

(map trampoline [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3])
;=> (-1 6 27)

Actually, you can abuse trampoline as funcall in clojure. But it is hardly idiomatic, because it is a Lisp-1. The above code evaluates to:

[(trampoline - 1 1 1), (trampoline + 2 2 2), (trampoline * 3 3 3)] which then becomes [-1 6 27] (in the form a of lazyseq to be precise).

As Adrian Mouat points out in the comment below, this probably isn't the preferred way to solve it. Using a funcall like construct smells a bit funny. There must be a cleaner solution. Until you've found that one, findfn can be helpful ;-).

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2  
I voted up for being a very interesting answer, but I wouldn't advise solving it this way! –  Adrian Mouat Nov 18 '11 at 15:48
    
I agree, that's why the first part of the answer is: "this is what juxt is for"... –  Michiel Borkent Nov 18 '11 at 15:51
1  
Still not convinced about the juxt part, Matt's (removed in edit) answer gave the wrong results. (map (apply juxt [- + *]) [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3]) gives result ([-1 3 1] [-2 6 8] [-3 9 27]) instead of (-1 6 27). Looks like findfn could be pretty useful though ! –  NielsK Nov 18 '11 at 15:56
    
You're right.. too quick. –  Michiel Borkent Nov 18 '11 at 16:08
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Edit: this will do what you want (as @BrandonH mentioned):

(map #(apply %1 %&) [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3])

But this is hardly an improvement over your version -- it just uses a shorthand for anonymous functions.


My understanding is that FUNCALL is necessary in Common Lisp, as it's a Lisp-2, whereas Clojure is a Lisp-1.

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Outcome of my function is (-1 6 27), yours is ([-1 3 1] [-2 6 8] [-3 9 27]). Edited my question so the meaning should be clearer. –  NielsK Nov 18 '11 at 13:55
    
@NielsK -- crap, I don't have access to Clojure at the moment. I'll have to wait to figure out what I screwed up. –  Matt Fenwick Nov 18 '11 at 13:56
    
No problem, had been thinking along those lines (juxt) as well, but somehow ended up with the invoke solution being the simplest. –  NielsK Nov 18 '11 at 14:34
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(map #(%1 %2 %3 %4) [- + *][1 2 3][1 2 3][1 2 3])

(-1 6 27)

The problem is that if you want to allow a variable number of arguments, the & syntax puts the values in a vector, necessitating the use of apply. Your solution looks fine to me but as Brandon H points out, you can shorten it to #(apply %1 %&).

As the other answerers have noted, it has nothing to do with funcall which I think is used in other Lisps to avoid ambiguity between symbols and functions (note that I called the function as (%1 ...) here, not (funcall %1 ...).

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(map #(apply %1 %&) [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3]) is totally acceptable in my opinion. –  Brandon H Nov 18 '11 at 14:44
1  
I agree, but it is essentially identical to the submitters version. –  Adrian Mouat Nov 18 '11 at 14:46
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I personally think your first version is pretty clear and idiomatic.

Here's an alternative you might find interesting to consider however:

(map 
  apply 
  [- + *] 
  (map vector [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3]))

=> (-1 6 27)

Note the trick of using (map vector ....) to transpose the sequence of arguments into ([1 1 1] [2 2 2] [3 3 3]) so that they can be used in the apply function.

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Another approach which is fairly self explanatory: "for each nth function, apply it to all nth elements of the vectors":

(defn my-juxt [fun-vec & val-vecs]
  (for [n (range 0 (count fun-vec))]
    (apply (fun-vec n) (map #(nth % n) val-vecs))))

user> (my-juxt [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3])
(-1 6 27)
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I can't right now thing of a clojure.core function that you could plug into your map and have it do what you want. So, I'd say, just use your own version.

Matt is probably right that the reason there isn't a funcall, is that you hardly ever need it in a Lisp-1 (meaning, functions and other bindings share the same name space in clojure)

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What about this one? It selects the relevant return values from juxt. Since this is all lazy, it should only calculate the elements needed.

user> (defn my-juxt [fns & colls] 
        (map-indexed (fn [i e] (e i))
          (apply map (apply juxt fns) colls)))
#'user/my-juxt
user> (my-juxt [- + *] [1 2 3] [1 2 3] [1 2 3])
(-1 6 27)
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Well, it uses juxt, it works, but I doubt it's more concise or idiomatic :) –  NielsK Nov 19 '11 at 15:02
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