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Stupid question, but none of the examples works for me; classic article "Pimp my Library" is buggy and even the simplest code has problems.

Btw. I assume you have to put conversion method in the object (a lot of snippets omit that part). According to PiS book it seems hanging implicit def is OK, but this gives me error as well.

object Minutes
{
  implicit def toMinutes(x : Int) = new Minutes(x)
}

class Minutes(private val x : Int)
{
  def minutes = x.toString+"m"
}

object MainApp {

  def main(args : Array[String])
  {
     println(5.minutes)
     ...

The error -- "value minutes is not a member of Int".

Question

What am I missing? Scala 2.9.1.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

All you need you to do is bring your implicit conversion into scope where you want to use it, so the compiler can find it...

def main(args : Array[String]) {
   import Minutes._
   println(5.minutes)
}
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Oh boy, I thought, since it is right above the main (the same file) it is in scope. Thank you. –  greenoldman Nov 18 '11 at 14:25
3  
@macias - Any time you leave braces, anything defined within those braces goes out of scope. –  Rex Kerr Nov 18 '11 at 14:52
    
@Rex Kerr, that's why I am surprised. Minutes (object and class) are in scope, so I thought it meant their methods are visible. This syntax shows you have to import individual methods -- I didn't do it for regular methods, but I guess implicit needs more explicit :-) approach. –  greenoldman Nov 18 '11 at 16:05
5  
@macias - Wait, what? Did you try def foo = 5 inside object Minutes and then try to use println(foo) in main? Just because you can get something using X.y doesn't mean that y is in scope. (It means that X is in scope.) –  Rex Kerr Nov 18 '11 at 16:35

The implicit conversion must be in scope, e.g.

def main(args : Array[String]) {
  import Minutes._
  println(5.minutes)
  ...
}

There are other ways, too, e.g. using package objects.

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Or putting the implicits into a trait and extending the trait –  ron Nov 18 '11 at 13:34
    
Thank you, anyway, it is strange there is no mentioning (i.e. warning) that putting stuff in the same file within the same package does not make the same scope. With package object I have to explicitly import the object (not only the package), so there is no difference actually. –  greenoldman Nov 18 '11 at 14:53
    
I, too, find it unusual that the explicit import is necessary. –  Dan Burton Nov 18 '11 at 21:24

You can get the example in the Pimp my library article to work as follows:

class RichArray[T: Manifest](value: Array[T]) {
  def append(other: Array[T]): Array[T] = {
    val result = new Array[T](value.length + other.length)
    Array.copy(value, 0, result, 0, value.length)
    Array.copy(other, 0, result, value.length, other.length)
    result
  }
}

implicit def enrichArray[T: Manifest](xs: Array[T]) = new RichArray[T](xs)

You need a context bound for T: [T: Manifest] is short for [T](implicit m: Manifest[T]). A Manifest is a way of passing the value of T to the method at runtime, when T is known. Normally the parameterized type information is used by the compiler to ensure type safety at compile time, but is not incorporated into the bytecode because the JVM can't handle it (type erasure). Scala collections changed in version 2.8 so that for performance reasons, Arrays are now not automatically wrapped by compiler magic, hence supplying a manifest for generic operations became necessary.

The other change is the (xs) argument for new RichArray[T]. I think that one's a typo.

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So answering this question got you thinking of another! –  Duncan McGregor Nov 19 '11 at 0:04

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