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I have several complex data structures like

Map< A, Set< B > >
Set< Map< A, B > >
Set< Map< A, Set< B > > >
Map< A, Map< B, Set< C > > >
and so on (more complex data structures)

Note: In my case it doesn't really matter if I use Set or List.

Now I know that JAXB let me define XmlAdapter's, that's fine, but I don't want to define an XmlAdapter for every of the given data structures (it would be just too much copy-and-paste code).

I tried to achieve my goal by declaring two generalizing XmlAdapters:

  • one for Map: MapAdapter<K,V>
  • one for Set: SetAdapter<V>

The problem:
JAXB complains as following:

javax.xml.bind.JAXBException:
class java.util.Collections$UnmodifiableMap nor any of its
  super class is known to this context.

Here is my adapter class:

import java.util.*;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.adapters.*;

public class Adapters {

public final static class MapAdapter<K, V>
		extends XmlAdapter<MapAdapter.Adapter<K, V>, Map<K, V>> {

	@XmlType
	@XmlRootElement
	public final static class Adapter<K, V> {

		@XmlElement
		protected List<MyEntry<K, V>> key = new LinkedList<MyEntry<K, V>>();

		private Adapter() {
		}

		public Adapter(Map<K, V> original) {
			for (Map.Entry<K, V> entry : original.entrySet()) {
				key.add(new MyEntry<K, V>(entry));
			}
		}

	}

	@XmlType
	@XmlRootElement
	public final static class MyEntry<K, V> {

		@XmlElement
		protected K key;

		@XmlElement
		protected V value;

		private MyEntry() {
		}

		public MyEntry(Map.Entry<K, V> original) {
			key = original.getKey();
			value = original.getValue();
		}

	}

	@Override
	public Adapter<K, V> marshal(Map<K, V> obj) {
		return new Adapter<K, V>(obj);
	}

	@Override
	public Map<K, V> unmarshal(Adapter<K, V> obj) {
		throw new UnsupportedOperationException("unmarshalling is never performed");
	}

}

}

Here is my JUnit test case:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
import javax.xml.bind.*;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.adapters.*;
import org.junit.*;
import static java.lang.System.*;

public class SomeTest {

@Test
public void _map2()
		throws Exception {

	Map<String, Map<String, String>> dataStructure =
			new HashMap<String, Map<String, String>>();

	Map<String, String> inner1 = new HashMap<String, String>();
	Map<String, String> inner2 = new HashMap<String, String>();

	dataStructure.put("a", inner1);
	dataStructure.put("b", inner1);

	inner1.put("a1", "1");
	inner1.put("a2", "2");
	inner2.put("b1", "1");
	inner2.put("b2", "2");

	JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(Adapters.XMap.class,
			Adapters.XCount.class, Adapters.XEntry.class);

	Marshaller marshaller = context.createMarshaller();
	marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FRAGMENT, true);
	marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);

	marshaller.setAdapter(new Adapters.MapAdapter());

	StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();

	marshaller.marshal(dataStructure, sw);
	out.println(sw.toString());
}

}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I've solved the problem without XmlAdapter's.

I've written JAXB-annotated objects for Map, Map.Entry and Collection.
The main idea is inside the method xmlizeNestedStructure(...):

Take a look at the code:

public final class Adapters {

private Adapters() {
}

public static Class<?>[] getXmlClasses() {
	return new Class<?>[]{
				XMap.class, XEntry.class, XCollection.class, XCount.class
			};
}

public static Object xmlizeNestedStructure(Object input) {
	if (input instanceof Map<?, ?>) {
		return xmlizeNestedMap((Map<?, ?>) input);
	}
	if (input instanceof Collection<?>) {
		return xmlizeNestedCollection((Collection<?>) input);
	}

	return input; // non-special object, return as is
}

public static XMap<?, ?> xmlizeNestedMap(Map<?, ?> input) {
	XMap<Object, Object> ret = new XMap<Object, Object>();

	for (Map.Entry<?, ?> e : input.entrySet()) {
		ret.add(xmlizeNestedStructure(e.getKey()),
				xmlizeNestedStructure(e.getValue()));
	}

	return ret;
}

public static XCollection<?> xmlizeNestedCollection(Collection<?> input) {
	XCollection<Object> ret = new XCollection<Object>();

	for (Object entry : input) {
		ret.add(xmlizeNestedStructure(entry));
	}

	return ret;
}

@XmlType
@XmlRootElement
public final static class XMap<K, V> {

	@XmlElementWrapper(name = "map")
	@XmlElement(name = "entry")
	private List<XEntry<K, V>> list = new LinkedList<XEntry<K, V>>();

	public XMap() {
	}

	public void add(K key, V value) {
		list.add(new XEntry<K, V>(key, value));
	}

}

@XmlType
@XmlRootElement
public final static class XEntry<K, V> {

	@XmlElement
	private K key;

	@XmlElement
	private V value;

	private XEntry() {
	}

	public XEntry(K key, V value) {
		this.key = key;
		this.value = value;
	}

}

@XmlType
@XmlRootElement
public final static class XCollection<V> {

	@XmlElementWrapper(name = "list")
	@XmlElement(name = "entry")
	private List<V> list = new LinkedList<V>();

	public XCollection() {
	}

	public void add(V obj) {
		list.add(obj);
	}

}

}

It works!

Let's look at a demo output:

<xMap>
	<map>
		<entry>
			<key xsi:type="xCount" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
				<count>1</count>
				<content xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">a</content>
			</key>
			<value xsi:type="xCollection" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
				<list>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">a1</entry>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">a2</entry>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">a3</entry>
				</list>
			</value>
		</entry>
		<entry>
			<key xsi:type="xCount" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
				<count>2</count>
				<content xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">b</content>
			</key>
			<value xsi:type="xCollection" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
				<list>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">b1</entry>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">b3</entry>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">b2</entry>
				</list>
			</value>
		</entry>
		<entry>
			<key xsi:type="xCount" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
				<count>3</count>
				<content xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">c</content>
			</key>
			<value xsi:type="xCollection" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
				<list>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">c1</entry>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">c2</entry>
					<entry xsi:type="xs:string" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">c3</entry>
				</list>
			</value>
		</entry>
	</map>
</xMap>

Sorry, the demo output uses also a data structure called "count" which is not mentioned in the Adapter's source code.

BTW: does anyone know how to remove all these annoying and (in my case) unnecessary xsi:type attributes?

share|improve this answer
    
Cool! I may have to do this myself sometime -- could you also post a summary of what you had to do in your .xjb bindings file? –  Jason S May 4 '09 at 0:26
    
I've never used the .xjb bindings file ;) The proposed solution just works ;) –  ivan_ivanovich_ivanoff May 4 '09 at 0:29
1  
I had to add @XmlSeeAlso({Adapters.XMap.class, Adapters.XCollection.class, Adapters.XEntry.class}) on my JAXB annotated class in order for this to work. –  ajitomatix Apr 21 '11 at 23:41
    
I keep getting blabla.XMap nor any of its super class is known to this context. :( –  crudolf Aug 8 '12 at 7:09

I had the same requirement to use a Map< String,Map< String,Integer>>. I used the XMLAdapter and it worked fine. Using XMLAdaptor is the cleanest solution I think. Below is the code of the adaptor. This is the jaXb class code snippet.

    @XmlJavaTypeAdapter(MapAdapter.class)
    Map<String, Map<String, Integer>> mapOfMap = new HashMap<String,Map<String, Integer>>();

MapType Class :

public class MapType {

public List<MapEntryType> host = new ArrayList<MapEntryType>();

}

MapEntry Type Class:

public class MapEntryType {

@XmlAttribute
public String ip;

@XmlElement
public List<LinkCountMapType> request_limit = new ArrayList<LinkCountMapType>();

}

LinkCountMapType Class:

public class LinkCountMapType {
@XmlAttribute
public String service;

@XmlValue
public Integer count;
}

Finally the MapAdaptor Class:

    public final class MapAdapter extends XmlAdapter<MapType, Map<String, Map<String, Integer>>> {

@Override
public Map<String, Map<String, Integer>> unmarshal(MapType v) throws Exception {
    Map<String, Map<String, Integer>> mainMap = new HashMap<String, Map<String, Integer>>();

    List<MapEntryType> myMapEntryTypes = v.host;
    for (MapEntryType myMapEntryType : myMapEntryTypes) {
        Map<String, Integer> linkCountMap = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
        for (LinkCountMapType myLinkCountMapType : myMapEntryType.request_limit) {
            linkCountMap.put(myLinkCountMapType.service, myLinkCountMapType.count);
        }
        mainMap.put(myMapEntryType.ip, linkCountMap);
    }
    return mainMap;
}

@Override
public MapType marshal(Map<String, Map<String, Integer>> v) throws Exception {
    MapType myMapType = new MapType();

    List<MapEntryType> entry = new ArrayList<MapEntryType>();

    for (String ip : v.keySet()) {
        MapEntryType myMapEntryType = new MapEntryType();
        Map<String, Integer> linkCountMap = v.get(ip);
        List<LinkCountMapType> linkCountList = new ArrayList<LinkCountMapType>();
        for (String link : linkCountMap.keySet()) {
            LinkCountMapType myLinkCountMapType = new LinkCountMapType();
            Integer count = linkCountMap.get(link);
            myLinkCountMapType.count = count;
            myLinkCountMapType.service = link;
            linkCountList.add(myLinkCountMapType);
        }
        myMapEntryType.ip = ip;
        myMapEntryType.request_limit = linkCountList;
        entry.add(myMapEntryType);
    }
    myMapType.host = entry;
    return myMapType;
}

}

Marshalling a Jaxb Object will give the below XML

     <mapOfmap>
    <host ip="127.0.0.1">
        <request_limit service="service1">7</request_limit>
        <request_limit service="service2">8</request_limit>
    </host>
</mapOfmap>
share|improve this answer

It looks like you're on the right track with XMLAdapter... the error message may be a clue:

class java.util.Collections$UnmodifiableMap nor any of its super class is known to this context.

are you wrapping a map using Collections.unmodifiableMap() anywhere? Where exactly does the error occur?


(previous answer left as a stale record for the curious)

You can create custom marshaller/unmarshaller logic that works a little more straighforward than the Adapters idea (I think; I haven't used that one before).

Basically the idea is that you specify a static function to do the work, and you can also create a custom class. (I usually put the static function in the class in question, but you don't have to.) Then you put a line in your .XJB file to tell JAXB to use your static function.

Now that I took a look at my existing code, I see that all I was doing was converting an attribute string to a custom Java object. Here's the code, for reference, but it's just for attributes.

JAXB file:

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<jaxb:bindings xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb"
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
    jaxb:version="2.0">	
    <jaxb:bindings schemaLocation={your schema} node="/xsd:schema">
    	<jaxb:bindings node={some XPATH expression to select a node}>
    		<jaxb:bindings node={maybe another XPATH relative to the above}>
    			<jaxb:property>
    				<jaxb:baseType>
    					<jaxb:javaType name={your custom Java class}
    						parseMethod={your static method for unmarshaling}
    						printMethod={your static method for marshaling}
    						/>
    				</jaxb:baseType>
    			</jaxb:property>
    		</jaxb:bindings>
    	</jaxb:bindings>
    </jaxb:bindings>
</jaxb:bindings>

(parseMethod and printMethod convert to/from attribute strings)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer! No, I'm not wrapping my maps anywhere, that's the strange thing. Might happen somewhere internally in JAXB. –  ivan_ivanovich_ivanoff May 3 '09 at 23:54
    
have you tried debugging, e.g. putting breakpoints on your marshaling/unmarshaling code? –  Jason S May 4 '09 at 0:00
    
I ended up writing own "wrappers", without XmlAdapter, see my answer. –  ivan_ivanovich_ivanoff May 4 '09 at 0:21

Here is my marshaller/unmarshaller for the list of @XmlType class.

E.g

//Type to marshall
@XmlType(name = "TimecardForm", propOrder = {
"trackId",
"formId"
}) 
public class TimecardForm {

    protected long trackId;
    protected long formId;
    ...
}

//a list holder
@XmlRootElement
public class ListHodler<T> {
    @XmlElement
    private List<T> value ;

    public ListHodler() {
    }

    public ListHodler(List<T> value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public List<T> getValue() {
        if(value == null)
            value = new ArrayList<T>();
        return this.value;
    }
}

//marshall collection of T
public static <T> void marshallXmlTypeCollection(List<T> value,
        Class<T> clzz, OutputStream os) {
    try {
        ListHodler<T> holder = new ListHodler<T>(value);
        JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(clzz,
                ListHodler.class);
        Marshaller m = context.createMarshaller();
        m.setProperty("jaxb.formatted.output", true);

        m.marshal(holder, os);
    } catch (JAXBException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

//unmarshall collection of T
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T> List<T> unmarshallXmlTypeCollection(Class<T> clzz,
        InputStream input) {
    try {
        JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(ListHodler.class, clzz);
        Unmarshaller u = context.createUnmarshaller();

        ListHodler<T> holder = (ListHodler<T>) u.unmarshal(new StreamSource(input));

        return holder.getValue();
    } catch (JAXBException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer

Following is the code with "dexmlize" ability based on above Ivan's code. Usage:

Map<String, List> nameMapResult = (Map<String, List>) Adapters.dexmlizeNestedStructure(unmarshallResult);

In order to restore the collection and map class, a new field will be xmlized to record the class information. Detailed code:

class Adapters {
    private Adapters() {
    }
    public static Class<?>[] getXmlClasses() {
            return new Class<?>[]{XMap.class, XEntry.class, XCollection.class};
    }
    public static Object xmlizeNestedStructure(Object input) {
            if (input instanceof Map<?, ?>) {
                    return xmlizeNestedMap((Map<?, ?>) input);
            }
            if (input instanceof Collection<?>) {
                    return xmlizeNestedCollection((Collection<?>) input);
            }
            return input; // non-special object, return as is
    }

    public static Object dexmlizeNestedStructure(Object input) {
        if (input instanceof XMap<?, ?>) {
                return dexmlizeNestedMap((XMap<?, ?>) input);
        }
        if (input instanceof XCollection<?>) {
                return dexmlizeNestedCollection((XCollection<?>) input);
        }
        return input; // non-special object, return as is
    }

    private static Object dexmlizeNestedCollection(XCollection<?> input)
    {
        Class<? extends Collection> clazz = input.getClazz();
        Collection collection = null;
        try
        {
            collection = clazz.newInstance();
            List dataList = input.getList();
            for (Object object : dataList)
            {
                collection.add(dexmlizeNestedStructure(object));
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return collection;
    }

    private static Object dexmlizeNestedMap(XMap<?, ?> input)
    {
        Class<? extends Map> clazz = input.getClazz();
        Map map = null;
        try
        {
            map = clazz.newInstance();
            List<? extends XEntry> entryList = input.getList();
            for (XEntry xEntry : entryList)
            {
                Object key = dexmlizeNestedStructure(xEntry.getKey());
                Object value = dexmlizeNestedStructure(xEntry.getValue());
                map.put(key, value);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return map;
    }

    public static XMap<?, ?> xmlizeNestedMap(Map<?, ?> input) {
            XMap<Object, Object> ret = new XMap<Object, Object>(input.getClass());

            for (Map.Entry<?, ?> e : input.entrySet()) {
                    ret.add(xmlizeNestedStructure(e.getKey()),
                                    xmlizeNestedStructure(e.getValue()));
            }
            return ret;
    }

    public static XCollection<?> xmlizeNestedCollection(Collection<?> input) {
            XCollection<Object> ret = new XCollection<Object>(input.getClass());

            for (Object entry : input) {
                    ret.add(xmlizeNestedStructure(entry));
            }
            return ret;
    }

    @XmlType
    @XmlRootElement
    public final static class XMap<K, V>{
            private List<XEntry<K, V>> list = new ArrayList<XEntry<K, V>>();
            private Class<? extends Map> clazz = null;

            public XMap(Class mapClazz) {
                this.clazz = (Class<? extends Map>)mapClazz;
            }

            public XMap() {
            }

            public void add(K key, V value) {
                    list.add(new XEntry<K, V>(key, value));
            }

            @XmlElementWrapper(name = "map")
            @XmlElement(name = "entry")
            public List<XEntry<K, V>> getList()
            {
                return list;
            }

            public void setList(List<XEntry<K, V>> list)
            {
                this.list = list;
            }

            @XmlElement(name="clazz")
            public Class<? extends Map> getClazz()
            {
                return clazz;
            }

            public void setClazz(Class<? extends Map> clazz)
            {
                this.clazz = clazz;
            }
    }

    @XmlType
    @XmlRootElement
    public final static class XEntry<K, V> {
            private K key;
            private V value;

            private XEntry() {
            }

            public XEntry(K key, V value) {
                    this.key = key;
                    this.value = value;
            }

            @XmlElement
            public K getKey()
            {
                return key;
            }

            public void setKey(K key)
            {
                this.key = key;
            }

            @XmlElement
            public V getValue()
            {
                return value;
            }

            public void setValue(V value)
            {
                this.value = value;
            }
    }

    @XmlType
    @XmlRootElement
    public final static class XCollection<V> {
            private List<V> list = new ArrayList<V>();
            private Class<? extends Collection> clazz = null; 

            public XCollection(Class collectionClazz) {
                this.clazz = collectionClazz;
            }

            public XCollection() {
            }

            public void add(V obj) {
                    list.add(obj);
            }

            @XmlElementWrapper(name = "collection")
            @XmlElement(name = "entry")
            public List<V> getList()
            {
                return list;
            }

            public void setList(List<V> list)
            {
                this.list = list;
            }

            @XmlElement(name="clazz")
            public Class<? extends Collection> getClazz()
            {
                return clazz;
            }


            public void setClazz(Class<? extends Collection> clazz)
            {
                this.clazz = clazz;
            }
    }

}
share|improve this answer

When working with complex schema structures - the JAXB binding can be crucial in resolving conflicted objects. The CAM Editor tool on Sourceforge allows you to automatically create JAXB bindings - see the quick guide here for more details - http://www.cameditor.org/#JAXB_Bindings

share|improve this answer

To fix this for JSON do: jackson with jaxb

<init-param>
        <param-name>com.sun.jersey.api.json.POJOMappingFeature</param-name>
        <param-value>true</param-value>
    </init-param>
share|improve this answer
    
Please be more descriptive in your answer. Refer:How to Answer –  askmish Oct 21 '12 at 15:05

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