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A normal java file executes only those methods called in the main. But what does a servlet do? I thought maybe it executes down the file but I just tried to split up a HTTP servlets request and response but it doesn't work. What is a neat way of working with a servlet to read an input stream, then execute some functions which can call the response writer method?

Here was my tryout code:

public void requestReader(HttpServletRequest req) {
    try {
        int len = req.getContentLength();
        byte[] input = new byte[len];

        ServletInputStream sin = req.getInputStream();
        int c, count = 0 ;
        while ((c = sin.read(input, count, input.length-count)) != -1) {
            count +=c;
        }

        sin.close();        
        String inString = new String(input);
        int index = inString.indexOf("=");            
        String value = inString.substring(index + 1);                        
        inputStream = URLDecoder.decode(value, "UTF-8");         

    } catch (IOException e) {

    }

}//end of requestReader 

public void responseWriter(HttpServletResponse resp) {
    try{
            resp.setStatus(HttpServletResponse.SC_OK);
            OutputStreamWriter writer = new OutputStreamWriter(resp.getOutputStream());
            writer.write("Working");    
            writer.flush();
            writer.close();               

    } catch (IOException e) {

    }


}//end of responseWriter    
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1  
stop worrying about servlets and input streams for a minute, what exactly are you trying to do ? do you just want to show a page or something? –  aishwarya Nov 18 '11 at 14:21
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7 Answers

A normal java file executes only those methods called in the main.

A "Java file" does not execute anything. The JVM, started by the java command line tool, executes the main method.

But what does a servlet do? I thought maybe it executes down the file

A servlet runs inside a Servlet Container, e.g. Apache Tomcat, or Jetty. The container itself is started via a main method, it learns about servlet classes in its web.xml file, and it calls the service() method of the servlet when a request arrives.

What is a neat way of working with a servlet to read an input stream, then execute some functions which can call the response writer method?

That's exactly what a servlet does (though the headers of a HTTP request are parsed by the servlet container and passed to the servlet as part of the request object). What are you really trying to do?

If you're not running a servlet container, it makes no sense to use servlets.

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Yes I'm using Apache Tomcat. What I'd really like to do is have one class that handles input. Then have a class that takes the String that was generated by the previous class. That does stuff to it, and then sends it to a third class that returns the string to client program. Just as opposed to having a single class that does everything. –  Eric Banderhide Nov 18 '11 at 17:50
    
@Eric Banderhide: sure, you can do all that. The servlet code can call all kinds of other classes. In fact, that's the usual case. –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 18 '11 at 20:21
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No Java class simply executes methods sequentially.

If you want to use multiple methods, you must break up your functionality and explicitly call the other methods you want to use, just like you do in a standalone program.

Servlet execution starts with a request handler, generally doPost or doGet.

Here's a tutorial to read through, but there are countless others--just search for "servlet tutorial".

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Methods are never executed sequentially. They are executed WHEN called.

The function of a servlet is to service HTTP requests from a web browser. For this, your servlet must implement a service() method and then call your methods from inside it.

You could also implement doPost() or doGet() but they only respond to the POST and GET commands.

You can start by looking here

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Servlets are typically used in the context of a web server. This is in contrast with a "normal Java file" which is typically executed from the command line and starts with the main method.

In order to get your servlet to work, you need to make it part of a Java web application. If you've never done this before, it would be best to follow a tutorial about Java web applications.

Briefly, the doPost, doGet, or service methods of HttpServlet are roughly equivalent to the main method (though with some important differences such as the main method is entered once while service can be entered many times).

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When a GET HTTP request comes in, and the servlet is mapped to the path of the request, then the servlet doGet method is called. If it's a POST, then doPost is called. You need to override one (or both) of these methods to do what you want with the request and the response.

Read the javadoc of HttpServlet to learn more.

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HttpServlet already define methods you can implement for different type of http request:

doGet()
doPost()
doDelete()
doPut()

etc...

All these methods have a request and response parameter.

You can read requested data, call any service you want, then write the response using the httpServletResponse from the parameter.

You don't have to define your own methods like you did in your question.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

To anyone interested, here is an update code that does work by passing the ServletResponse to another class:

public void doPost(HttpServletRequest req, HttpServletResponse resp) {
    try {
        int len = req.getContentLength();
        byte[] input = new byte[len];

        ServletInputStream sin = req.getInputStream();
        int c, count = 0 ;
        while ((c = sin.read(input, count, input.length-count)) != -1) {
            count +=c;
        }

        sin.close();        
        String inString = new String(input);
        int index = inString.indexOf("=");            
        String value = inString.substring(index + 1);                        
        inputStream = URLDecoder.decode(value, "UTF-8");         

    } catch (IOException e) {

    }
    responseWriter(resp);
}//end of requestReader 

public void responseWriter(HttpServletResponse resp) {
    try{
            resp.setStatus(HttpServletResponse.SC_OK);
            OutputStreamWriter writer = new OutputStreamWriter(resp.getOutputStream());
            writer.write("Working");    
            writer.flush();
            writer.close();               

    } catch (IOException e) {

    }


}//end of responseWriter   

This was all I was trying to achieve when I asked the question.

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